RCMP APPLICANT GENERAL CHIT CHAT

Discuss the educational and physical requirements, testing process and background phase involved in the hiring process. Includes the experiences and advice of current and past applicants. All agency application related questions belong here.
Canadianpatriot
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Re: RCMP APPLICANT GENERAL CHIT CHAT

Postby Canadianpatriot » Mon Nov 30, 2020 6:57 pm

Glasgow wrote:
Mon Nov 30, 2020 5:18 pm
Been a long road but just got email today, security clearance granted, just waiting again, but super exited.

RCMP application reinserted—-21July2019
SP sent——01 August 2019
Sp accepted—09 August 2019
Security — 14 August missing info sent.
Sp— accepted 15 August 2019
Rmqa—27 September 2019
RFI—-03 October 2019-recommended
Field investigation—04 October 2019
Field investigation— recommended 22 Oct 2019
PEP—-12 November 2019
Pep Rec—16 November 2019
Medical—25 October 2019
Psych—05 December 2019
Medical recommended—-31 December 2019
Security clearance—granted 30 November 2020
Troop—-
Congrats ! 11 months of nails biting paid off.
"The more you know, the less you fear" - Astronaut Cpt. Chris Hadfield.

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Re: RCMP APPLICANT GENERAL CHIT CHAT

Postby Eagles1992 » Wed Dec 02, 2020 4:07 pm

Hello all!

I am entering the final lap of my application process (waiting for medical/security clearance). Seeing that security can be a wait, I just wanted to know if there is anything else other than fitness one can improve on before arriving at depot?

Thanks!

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Re: RCMP APPLICANT GENERAL CHIT CHAT

Postby BMAN-22 » Wed Dec 02, 2020 10:25 pm

Eagles1992 wrote:
Wed Dec 02, 2020 4:07 pm
Hello all!

I am entering the final lap of my application process (waiting for medical/security clearance). Seeing that security can be a wait, I just wanted to know if there is anything else other than fitness one can improve on before arriving at depot?

Thanks!
You can always keep adding to your resume i.e. volunteering etc... but also stay healthy and stay out of trouble.
RCMP General Duty - B Division

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Re: RCMP APPLICANT GENERAL CHIT CHAT

Postby Pho-fo-Sho » Wed Dec 02, 2020 10:51 pm

Eagles1992 wrote:
Wed Dec 02, 2020 4:07 pm
Hello all!

I am entering the final lap of my application process (waiting for medical/security clearance). Seeing that security can be a wait, I just wanted to know if there is anything else other than fitness one can improve on before arriving at depot?

Thanks!
Run, run and run.

And there might be those who disagree with this action, but you should familiarize yourself in shooting a pistol. I've seen a lot of cadets get terminated for pistol qualification. The reason why it is controversial is due to the fact that the RCMP trains you to shoot their way - but I would argue that there is no harm in being comfortable in handling a pistol - just be aware to not develop bad habits.
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Re: RCMP APPLICANT GENERAL CHIT CHAT

Postby Tornelco » Thu Dec 03, 2020 1:17 am

Pho-fo-Sho wrote:
Wed Dec 02, 2020 10:51 pm

And there might be those who disagree with this action, but you should familiarize yourself in shooting a pistol. I've seen a lot of cadets get terminated for pistol qualification. The reason why it is controversial is due to the fact that the RCMP trains you to shoot their way - but I would argue that there is no harm in being comfortable in handling a pistol - just be aware to not develop bad habits.
Dave Brown is very passionate about this subject, hope he drops by for some input.

I am surprised that cadets get terminated for firearms qualifications. I thought back-trooping would be an option if marksmanship skills were lacking. Or, are you referring to a cadet flagging his colleagues and/or facilitators? Because I have heard that the CBSA would have someone packed up and out the door in a heartbeat for flagging.
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Re: RCMP APPLICANT GENERAL CHIT CHAT

Postby Pho-fo-Sho » Thu Dec 03, 2020 3:13 am

Tornelco wrote:
Thu Dec 03, 2020 1:17 am
I am surprised that cadets get terminated for firearms qualifications. I thought back-trooping would be an option if marksmanship skills were lacking. Or, are you referring to a cadet flagging his colleagues and/or facilitators? Because I have heard that the CBSA would have someone packed up and out the door in a heartbeat for flagging.
I've heard and seen things. It's a lot more strict with the new integrated carbine training as new cadets are given a carbine fairly early in training as opposed to the old FTU training program. I know for sure my carbine instructor has a very strong opinion about the new integrated carbine program.

That being said, the new integrated program does allow more time allotment on the range, however learning to shoot with the carbine is fairly easy, pistol qualifications, shooting the required score, is the the one that usually gets people either back-trooped or sent home (if they have been back-trooped before).

If a cadet under the new program flash someone on the line - it's "usually" a straight up termination - but it really depends on the circumstances. epeac895 can explain more about it since he was in the first troop to go through it - all I got is hearsay.

Now if it was a pistol, you'd get a "U", clear it up, carry on and make sure you don't do it again. I've personally seen that happen.
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Re: RCMP APPLICANT GENERAL CHIT CHAT

Postby Silvaticus » Thu Dec 03, 2020 11:00 am

Pho-fo-Sho wrote:
Thu Dec 03, 2020 3:13 am
Tornelco wrote:
Thu Dec 03, 2020 1:17 am
I am surprised that cadets get terminated for firearms qualifications. I thought back-trooping would be an option if marksmanship skills were lacking. Or, are you referring to a cadet flagging his colleagues and/or facilitators? Because I have heard that the CBSA would have someone packed up and out the door in a heartbeat for flagging.
I've heard and seen things. It's a lot more strict with the new integrated carbine training as new cadets are given a carbine fairly early in training as opposed to the old FTU training program. I know for sure my carbine instructor has a very strong opinion about the new integrated carbine program.

That being said, the new integrated program does allow more time allotment on the range, however learning to shoot with the carbine is fairly easy, pistol qualifications, shooting the required score, is the the one that usually gets people either back-trooped or sent home (if they have been back-trooped before).

If a cadet under the new program flash someone on the line - it's "usually" a straight up termination - but it really depends on the circumstances. epeac895 can explain more about it since he was in the first troop to go through it - all I got is hearsay.

Now if it was a pistol, you'd get a "U", clear it up, carry on and make sure you don't do it again. I've personally seen that happen.
So its not so much that they suck at shooting but more management and general safety of the firearm? I mean, keep the pointy end away from things you don't want to kill. Seems straight forward no?
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Re: RCMP APPLICANT GENERAL CHIT CHAT

Postby Xfit » Thu Dec 03, 2020 12:48 pm

Any F Div applicants waiting on a medical clearance or recently received one? Anybody know if your file moves to security before being medically cleared? Thank you!

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Re: RCMP APPLICANT GENERAL CHIT CHAT

Postby VanSmack » Thu Dec 03, 2020 1:46 pm

The decisions on backtrooping vs terminating is made on a case by case basis and entirely dependent on the cadets entire body of work within the program. It is reviewed by several layers of supervision and must be supported by what's been documented on the cadets training file. Even a safety on the Carbine isn't necessarily an automatic termination.

If you're shitty on firearms and are showing effort to get better but maybe aren't developing fast enough but otherwise you're performing well in every other area then you will probably get offered to be backtrooped so. You'll have more time with a firearms instructor to get yourself where you need to be. It's the same in every area of training. If you fail firearms but aren't practicing, have a shitty attitude, have shitty performance in other areas and are generally not showing anything to suggest its realistic for you to do better the second time around, you'll probably be terminated.

Aside from failing something, if you do something that violates the core values you can also find yourself in a file review for termination. This is all explained in very clear terms when you arrive.

So just being shitty in firearms isn't likely to get you terminated. None of the instructors in any unit want to see anyone fail if they are putting forth effort, and they will go. To extraordinary lengths to get you where you need to be. If someone does get terminated and not offered a new troop, there's usually a hell of a lot more than just failing to meet a benchmark score on pistol qualification.
Don't call it a comeback...

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Re: RCMP APPLICANT GENERAL CHIT CHAT

Postby Sasky306 » Thu Dec 03, 2020 3:37 pm

Xfit wrote:
Thu Dec 03, 2020 12:48 pm
Any F Div applicants waiting on a medical clearance or recently received one? Anybody know if your file moves to security before being medically cleared? Thank you!
I received my medical/psych clearance mid-November and was told it was being prepared to be sent to Security.

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Re: RCMP APPLICANT GENERAL CHIT CHAT

Postby John014 » Thu Dec 03, 2020 4:32 pm

Tornelco wrote:
Thu Dec 03, 2020 1:17 am
Pho-fo-Sho wrote:
Wed Dec 02, 2020 10:51 pm

And there might be those who disagree with this action, but you should familiarize yourself in shooting a pistol. I've seen a lot of cadets get terminated for pistol qualification. The reason why it is controversial is due to the fact that the RCMP trains you to shoot their way - but I would argue that there is no harm in being comfortable in handling a pistol - just be aware to not develop bad habits.
Dave Brown is very passionate about this subject, hope he drops by for some input.

I am surprised that cadets get terminated for firearms qualifications. I thought back-trooping would be an option if marksmanship skills were lacking. Or, are you referring to a cadet flagging his colleagues and/or facilitators? Because I have heard that the CBSA would have someone packed up and out the door in a heartbeat for flagging.
If there has been no real improvement over the training period then why back troop that cadet. If you cannot get up to speed in 6 months of dedicated shooting then you will be horrific when you shoot once a year.

Now if the cadet showed some skills and just pooched the final shoot (not even sure that is possible with the new course of fire) then a back troop would be reasonable and would be up to the CO at that time.

Also the shooting could possibly the final straw and that cadet needs to go home.
If you choose Law Enforcement you LOSE the right to be unfit.

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Re: RCMP APPLICANT GENERAL CHIT CHAT

Postby Dave Brown » Thu Dec 03, 2020 5:12 pm

No one wants a recruit to fail. Your instructors will always be your best resource.

Some recruits come in with a little experience with firearms; some come in with a lot; and some come in with zero. It doesn't matter. It's not previous skills that will decide who passes and who fails - it is ATTITUDE.

The instructors are there to keep you and everyone else around you, alive. They know their jobs! They are not there to teaching shooting skills in order to pass qualification tests or safety skills to not get you booted. They are there to teach you LIFETIME safety skills, plus shooting skills you may or may not ever need for the next 30 years ... but when you need them, you will need them NOW.

Recruits with zero experience have the advantage of no bad habits. So, here is my advice:
1) Come in; sit down; be a sponge.
2) See 1)

Recruits with some experience:
3) See 1)

Recruits with LOTS of experience with firearms:
4) See 1)

The six basic pistol skills that MUST be imprinted into the subconscious are grip, stance, sight picture, trigger control, the draw from the holster and the reload (especially the slide-back reload.)

The skill that you need more than anything else to pass is trigger control. Learn how to control the trigger. Learn how to pull smooth and fast without disturbing the sight picture. Learn how to "read" and analyze your targets. Learn how to solve the four basic errors in grip and trigger control. (Squeezing too tight with the strong hand; not controlling the trigger; not focusing on the front sight; not concentrating.)

The two basic skills lacking with recruits who have not taken a GOOD firearms safety course such as the CFSC and CRFSC are, lack of muzzle control and lack of trigger finger discipline. You will see that on day one of pistol training. One recruit is always conscious of their muzzle direction and is always in control. They know EXACTLY where it is pointed. Their finger is ALWAYS outside the trigger guard - up on the frame where everyone else can clearly see it - unless they are physically pulling the trigger.

But there will inevitably be one or two recruits who let the the pistol dangle, walk around with their finger inside the trigger guard or treat it like it's a toy because "Gee Corporal ... it's empty."

It is NEVER "empty."

And I can almost guarantee one thing. If you sweep your instructor and your fellow students with the muzzle of your firearm, you will be gone, packed and out the gate within the hour.

So, the decision on whether to get experience with firearms before one goes to depot rests entirely with the person. If you are the type who knows they know nothing and will listen and do exactly the what the instructor tells them ... then the advantage is you will have no bad habits starting out. Take the CFSC and CRFSC before you go to depot. You will not regret it.

If you are the type who wants to be a bit more comfortable around the pistol and the rifle before you get there; who thinks one can never have too much safety instruction, and who thinks firearms safety needs to be a lifetime skill ... take the CFSC and CRFSC. Practice with a pistol beforehand is not likely to help unless you can find an instructor who knows what they are doing; knows the skills that will be taught in depot and - most important - knows how to keep it simple.

If you are the type who plays Call of Duty; signs up for multi-day "combat" pistol courses and "combat" rifle courses; knows five ways to hold a flashlight and ten different ways to reload an AR; and can teach the instructors a thing or two about shooting ... well, my only advice would be to not let the door hit you on the way out. You are going to have a very rough time in depot unless you can learn the following on day one:
1) Sit down.
2) Shut up.
3) Do what the instructor tells you.
4) Repeat as necessary.

Sean Connery accent. So endith the lesson.

Your number one goal in law enforcement is not to make it home alive at the end of every shift. Your number one goal is to make sure EVERYONE gets to go home alive at the end of your shift.

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Re: RCMP APPLICANT GENERAL CHIT CHAT

Postby DanyD92 » Thu Dec 03, 2020 5:20 pm

Dave Brown wrote:
Thu Dec 03, 2020 5:12 pm


If you are the type who plays Call of Duty; signs up for multi-day "combat" pistol courses and "combat" rifle courses; knows five ways to hold a flashlight and ten different ways to reload an AR; and can teach the instructors a thing or two about shooting ... well, my only advice would be to not let the door hit you on the way out. You are going to have a very rough time in depot unless you can learn the following on day one:
1) Sit down.
2) Shut up.
3) Do what the instructor tells you.
4) Repeat as necessary.

Sean Connery accent. So endith the lesson. Your number one goal in law enforcement is not to make it home alive at the end of every shift. Your number one goal is to make sure EVERYONE gets to go home alive at the end of your shift.
Basically what I was told by a few people when it came to firearms at depot. Do it their way, once out take all of the courses you want to be more proficient.

I'm fairly proficient in firearms, shotgun, pistol and carbine. I've shot competition as well. But like you said I'm going in with the sit down, shut up and do what your told mentality.

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Re: RCMP APPLICANT GENERAL CHIT CHAT

Postby VanSmack » Thu Dec 03, 2020 7:00 pm

If you are someone who has no experience shooting handguns whatsoever, are already well into the application process and are thinking going out and shooting recreationally will help you be more successful at Depot, you are wrong. It would be like saying you are going to take beginners BJJ classes for the next two months to get a head start on PDT, although the BJJ is probably still more useful, because at least you’ll learn how to stretch in those two months. Even if you had a firearms instructor giving you one on one time, I highly doubt it would be of any benefit whatsoever. Besides all that, recreational shooting vs. how they teach you to shoot in a police context is drastically different, and will impact the way a number of fundamentals are taught, stance/posture come to mind right off the bat.

If you’re someone who’s been shooting for years, your only real advantages are that you’re (hopefully) accustomed to practicing good muzzle control and the other safety stuff Dave talked about, and are at least somewhat used to the sounds of gunshots around you. Until you’ve had our pistol in your hand, trying to develop appropriate trigger pull and sight picture, etc. with a gun that has different ergonomics, weight, trigger pull, etc. is only going to make your life more complicated.
Don't call it a comeback...

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Re: RCMP APPLICANT GENERAL CHIT CHAT

Postby DanyD92 » Thu Dec 03, 2020 7:13 pm

VanSmack wrote:
Thu Dec 03, 2020 7:00 pm

If you’re someone who’s been shooting for years, your only real advantages are that you’re (hopefully) accustomed to practicing good muzzle control and the other safety stuff Dave talked about, and are at least somewhat used to the sounds of gunshots around you. Until you’ve had our pistol in your hand, trying to develop appropriate trigger pull and sight picture, etc. with a gun that has different ergonomics, weight, trigger pull, etc. is only going to make your life more complicated.
So what your saying is I can't use the SW to buy a sigp226 and justify to my wife that it will make me a better marksman at depot?


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