CN Police

Post your suggestions to the editor for possible stories you would like to see in an upcoming issue Blue Line Magazine.
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SébR.
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CN Police

Postby SébR. » Fri Mar 03, 2006 8:22 pm

I would be interested in learning about CN Police.
I'm a cop in Montréal (yes a frog ;) , that like your forum!). The other day I have had a mini-pursuit against a dodge magnum, and it ending up in in the back of a CN police squad car.

I never really know what were their functions and tasks, nor their history! That could be a good subjet (according to me that is)!

Thanks a lot

SÉB.
MONTRÉAL P.D.

p.s. Pardon my english mistakes! As you can see, "je parle Français!" :D

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Postby T.M.DIESEL » Fri Mar 03, 2006 10:10 pm

I would help out but RailCop is the expert on this subject so I will let him strut his stuff. ;)

Was also an article in Blueline Magazine about CN Police, lots of history behind it and an interesting service.
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SébR.
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Postby SébR. » Fri Mar 03, 2006 10:40 pm

Do you know when this article was publish?

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Postby Game Face » Fri Mar 03, 2006 10:46 pm

History of the CN Police
In the late 19th century, rail lines and property in Canada were located all over the country. Increases in crimes such as armed hold-ups and hijackings made the need for system-wide policing more apparent.
After many years of lobbying the Federal Government, the railway companies operating in Canada were successful in establishing their own Police Departments. Railway police officers, incorporated into the initial Railway Act of Canada in 1860, had similar powers of arrest and enforcement as those granted to other federal and provincial police departments.

The CN Police Service was formed in 1923 following the creation of the Canadian National Railway Company, an amalgamation of the Grand Trunk Western Railway, Grand Trunk Pacific, Intercontinental Railway, National Transcontinental, Canadian Northern, in addition to numerous small railway lines. Today, CN Police reflects the challenges and complexities of ensuring a safe and secure environment for rail freight traffic throughout North America.

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Re: CN Police

Postby critical assessment » Thu Jun 26, 2008 12:19 am

Railway constables in Canada are appointed police constables by virtue of section 44 (1) to 44 (6) of the Railway Safety Act, before a justice of the superior court in the province in which the constable is going to be working in. Such appointment gives the constable authority along the rail line anywhere in Canada. The appointment limits the constable's jurisdiction to 500 meters from the company property or about 1500 feet. Prior appointments were under section 158 of the Canada Transportation Act and Section 425 of the Railway Act of Canada.

The duties include criminal enforcement, enforcement of provincial statues, drug enforcement, involvement in Operation Lifesaver (train vs vehicle awareness) internal company investigations and lately risk management functions. A lot of traffic enforcement work is done at railway crossings and in certain municipal roads next to the rail line were speed control is a factor. Sixty percent of all calls a railway police officer gets is to remove trespassers from the property, which can be a tiring task but is necessary in the interests of safety.

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Re: CN Police

Postby ryan.p » Thu Jun 26, 2008 12:09 pm

Go on with your story about ending up hitting a CN car...
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Re: CN Police

Postby Respond Wayne » Thu Jun 26, 2008 7:42 pm

critical assessment wrote:...The appointment limits the constable's jurisdiction to 500 meters from the company property or about 1500 feet...


gogethimjohnny? :roll:

Might as well put it out there... :troll:
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Re: CN Police

Postby railcop » Wed Jul 09, 2008 2:15 pm

critical assessment wrote:Railway constables in Canada are appointed police constables by virtue of section 44 (1) to 44 (6) of the Railway Safety Act, before a justice of the superior court in the province in which the constable is going to be working in. Such appointment gives the constable authority along the rail line anywhere in Canada. The appointment limits the constable's jurisdiction to 500 meters from the company property or about 1500 feet. Prior appointments were under section 158 of the Canada Transportation Act and Section 425 of the Railway Act of Canada.

The duties include criminal enforcement, enforcement of provincial statues, drug enforcement, involvement in Operation Lifesaver (train vs vehicle awareness) internal company investigations and lately risk management functions. A lot of traffic enforcement work is done at railway crossings and in certain municipal roads next to the rail line were speed control is a factor. Sixty percent of all calls a railway police officer gets is to remove trespassers from the property, which can be a tiring task but is necessary in the interests of safety.



Operation Life Saver is a little more than train vs vehicle awareness. Check out the link on my sig. line.

In Ontario we have jurisdiction province wide for provincial offences. One of the Blueline staff may be able to assist with the date of the article regarding our service. I believe it was early 2007.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CN_Police

If you have access to the LEO section, I have a thread running there on some of our enforcement/community service activities.
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Re: CN Police

Postby critical assessment » Sat Jul 12, 2008 6:18 pm

railcop wrote:
critical assessment wrote:Railway constables in Canada are appointed police constables by virtue of section 44 (1) to 44 (6) of the Railway Safety Act, before a justice of the superior court in the province in which the constable is going to be working in. Such appointment gives the constable authority along the rail line anywhere in Canada. The appointment limits the constable's jurisdiction to 500 meters from the company property or about 1500 feet. Prior appointments were under section 158 of the Canada Transportation Act and Section 425 of the Railway Act of Canada.

The duties include criminal enforcement, enforcement of provincial statues, drug enforcement, involvement in Operation Lifesaver (train vs vehicle awareness) internal company investigations and lately risk management functions. A lot of traffic enforcement work is done at railway crossings and in certain municipal roads next to the rail line were speed control is a factor. Sixty percent of all calls a railway police officer gets is to remove trespassers from the property, which can be a tiring task but is necessary in the interests of safety.



Operation Life Saver is a little more than train vs vehicle awareness. Check out the link on my sig. line.

In Ontario we have jurisdiction province wide for provincial offences. One of the Blueline staff may be able to assist with the date of the article regarding our service. I believe it was early 2007.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CN_Police

If you have access to the LEO section, I have a thread running there on some of our enforcement/community service activities.


Well you may have province wide jurisdiction in Ontraio but that does not hold for the rest of the CN Police officers in Canada. Operation Lifesaver is all about trains versus vehicles, all terrain vehicles, snowmobiles, pedertrians and any other obstructions on the tracks which may impede railway operations and or harm the public.

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Re: CN Police

Postby railcop » Sat Jul 12, 2008 10:58 pm

critical assessment wrote:
railcop wrote:
critical assessment wrote:Railway constables in Canada are appointed police constables by virtue of section 44 (1) to 44 (6) of the Railway Safety Act, before a justice of the superior court in the province in which the constable is going to be working in. Such appointment gives the constable authority along the rail line anywhere in Canada. The appointment limits the constable's jurisdiction to 500 meters from the company property or about 1500 feet. Prior appointments were under section 158 of the Canada Transportation Act and Section 425 of the Railway Act of Canada.

The duties include criminal enforcement, enforcement of provincial statues, drug enforcement, involvement in Operation Lifesaver (train vs vehicle awareness) internal company investigations and lately risk management functions. A lot of traffic enforcement work is done at railway crossings and in certain municipal roads next to the rail line were speed control is a factor. Sixty percent of all calls a railway police officer gets is to remove trespassers from the property, which can be a tiring task but is necessary in the interests of safety.



Operation Life Saver is a little more than train vs vehicle awareness. Check out the link on my sig. line.

In Ontario we have jurisdiction province wide for provincial offences. One of the Blueline staff may be able to assist with the date of the article regarding our service. I believe it was early 2007.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CN_Police

If you have access to the LEO section, I have a thread running there on some of our enforcement/community service activities.


Well you may have province wide jurisdiction in Ontraio but that does not hold for the rest of the CN Police officers in Canada. Operation Lifesaver is all about trains versus vehicles, all terrain vehicles, snowmobiles, pedertrians and any other obstructions on the tracks which may impede railway operations and or harm the public.


Which is why I stated we have provincial jurisdiction in Ontario. :banghead: Thank your for your expert opinion Johnny.
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Re: CN Police

Postby youngapplicant » Thu Dec 11, 2008 11:25 pm

are all CN Police officers graduates of a police science program, or do they do there own training?

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Re: CN Police

Postby ASGPS Sheriff » Fri Dec 12, 2008 1:40 am

I believe for a time they were training at DEPOT and now I think they train somewhere in Ontario and I pretty sure the training is apporx 8 weeks were they are trained in the relevant areas IE CCC, PPCT, Driving and the remainder of the training is done at there posting with there FTO.

Sorry if I am incorrect on some of these.

A.S.

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Re: CN Police

Postby Paul R » Fri Dec 12, 2008 10:33 am

Okay class, settle down.

Now everybody take out their December 2008 issue of Blueline magazine and go to page 23. Now read the paragraph under Mar 2004. Also have a look at the cover shot 4th from the left at the top of the page.
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