Saskatoon Police Officer involved in a fatal shooting

Discussion, questions on police use of force procedures.
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Saskatoon Police Officer involved in a fatal shooting

Postby Redbull » Mon May 03, 2004 10:34 pm

Officer involved in fatal shooting


The StarPhoenix


Saturday, May 01, 2004




A Saskatoon police officer was involved in a shooting at a convenience store Friday evening, resulting in the death of one man.

The incident happened at 6:20 p.m. at the 29th Street Confectionary at 29th Street and Avenue I.

The 35-year-old man killed in the incident won't be identified until police have a chance to contact his family.

Police say no members of the Saskatoon Police Service were injured in the incident, but no further details were available at press time. The major crimes unit continues to investigate.

? The StarPhoenix (Saskatoon) 2004



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I wish the Officer involved well in dealing with this tragic event.

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Postby Redbull » Mon May 03, 2004 10:38 pm

Shooting baffles owners of west-side grocery store

Betty Ann Adam
The StarPhoenix


May 3, 2004




A Saskatoon couple were surprised and baffled when a man was shot to death by police inside their Westmount neighbourhood grocery store early Friday evening.

The name of the 35-year-old victim has not yet been released and police refused to comment during the weekend.

The single gunshot was fired about 6:20 p.m. at Twenty-Ninth Street Confectionery & Grocery at 819 29th St. West. The major crimes unit is investigating.

Owners Kay and David Chan, who live in a suite at the store, were taking a supper break in the main-floor kitchen behind the store, when they heard a scream from the young woman who was working the counter for them, Kay Chan said Sunday, demonstrating with a scream and quick descriptions in Cantonese.

Chan's son, Simon, 18, helped convey his mother's story, as the family's huge yellow lab stayed close to its mistress.

The man was already being pursued by police when he entered the store, Chan said. She did not think the man was attempting to rob them. She did not see if he was carrying a weapon.

Chan said she and her husband were rushing to see why the woman had screamed, when a short man in a black jacket ran into the private area of the store, heading directly for the back door that leads to a paved parking area off the alley.

The man was trying to open the door but it was locked. As the man tried to force the door open with his shoulder, David Chan, who had already armed himself with a long-handled sidewalk ice scraper, told his wife to get back into the kitchen.

Before Chan could do anything, a police officer followed from the store and seized the man. The officer grappled with the man, who was fighting to get away. The pair moved back into the store.

Within one or two minutes, Kay Chan said she heard the boom of a firearm being discharged.

There were two officers present when she went into the store to see what had happened, she said. Later, many police arrived, she said.

The whole thing happened very quickly, she said.

Chan said her first thought during the incident was that the store was being robbed, as it has been in the past.

She hadn't even reached the alarm trigger when the police officer had charged in after the man, which confused Chan, who wondered how the police had gotten there so quickly.

"I'm OK now," she said.

Simon Chan said he and his brother were at work when their parents phoned them from the police station to say there had been a shooting in the store.

Simon, who lives with his parents, was not allowed to enter the premises until about 2:30 a.m. when his parents came home.


? The StarPhoenix (Saskatoon) 2004





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There was a press conferance held this afternoon where more of the story was revealed. I will post it after it is printed in the paper tomorrow.

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Postby Redbull » Tue May 04, 2004 8:06 am

Officer forced to shoot
Sabo

Darren Bernhardt
The StarPhoenix


Tuesday, May 04, 2004

Saskatoon city police Chief Russell Sabo issues a statement Monday on the recent shooting death by a police officer
CREDIT: Richard Marjan, The StarPhoenix





The officer involved in a fatal shooting at a convenience store Friday had no choice but to fire a single bullet into the suspect's head when the man, trapped inside the store, pulled out a handgun, police Chief Russell Sabo said Monday.

Andrew Wayne Moore, 35, was shot inside the Twenty-Ninth Street Confectionery and Grocery at about 6:20 p.m. Friday. Police did not release the name of the officer, but Sabo said he is a constable with 10 years experience.

The officer's conduct will be investigated to determine if criminal wrongdoing took place, but Sabo said he believes the constable acted appropriately.

"It is apparent that the officer involved attempted to resolve this matter without having to resort to the application of lethal force. Regretfully, this was not the case and has resulted in the unfortunate loss of life," Sabo told a press conference Monday.

It is premature to comment on whether the officer could be facing charges, Sabo added.

"At this point in time, all indications are the officer acted according to the training that he has been given and was considering the safety of not only himself but other people in the area."

The constable was on patrol Friday evening when he recognized Moore at the corner of 29th Street and Avenue I from previous dealings with him. In March, the officer had requested Criminal Code warrants for dangerous driving and obstructing a police officer to be issued against Moore.

The officer intended to make an arrest based on those warrants when he saw Moore on Friday. He requested back-up, then advised Moore he was under arrest. Moore ignored him and walked away, Sabo said.

The officer pepper-sprayed Moore to stop him but it had no effect as Moore was wearing tight, wrap-around sunglasses protecting his eyes. The officer went after him again and a chase on foot began.

Sabo said Moore dashed into the confectionery and through it, attempting to get out the back door. The back-up officer was there waiting but Moore couldn't get the door open. The pursuing constable caught up and tried to apprehend Moore inside the rear of the building. That resulted in a fight between the two, during which the officer saw the gun in Moore's hand, Sabo said.

In that situation, the weapon is considered to be drawn, Sabo said.

"The officer repeatedly ordered Mr. Moore to drop the firearm. Mr. Moore refused to comply and continued to resist arrest," he added. "As the struggle progressed, the officer felt his life and possibly the lives of others in the vicinity of the confrontation were in peril. In order to protect himself and the others, the officer delivered a single shot from his service pistol to Mr. Moore, striking him in the head."

The officer immediately called for an ambulance but "regretfully, Mr. Moore was pronounced dead at the scene," Sabo said.

Asked if it was standard procedure to shoot-to-kill in such situations, Sabo deferred to Insp. Lorne Constantinoff, a use-of-force instructor for the police service.

"What the officers are trying to achieve when the application of lethal force is delivered is cessation of activity," Constantinoff said. "No two situations can be the same. It is up to the sole discretion of that officer to ensure that level of cessation of activity has been achieved.

"The application of force is delivered until that desired effect has been achieved. In this situation, it was one shot."

City police association president Stan Goertzen said the union supports the officer's actions and will make sure the constable "doesn't have his rights trampled on" during the investigation.

Goertzen has been in touch with the officer, who is on days off and awaiting a psychological assessment.

The officer is taking peer counselling provided by the force.

If he is cleared to return to work, he can do so while the investigation is underway.

"This is the worst possible situation an officer can face. Nobody joins the police force to get involved in a life-or-death situation," Goertzen said. "But it's the nature of dealing with human beings -- they're unpredictable.

"And regardless of whose actions precipitated it, it's a tragedy for the officer, for his family, for victim's family and for the community. This is not stuff the community would like to see going on. But I can tell you this officer is a very capable guy, I know that."

No timeline has been set for the investigation, which will be performed by the force's major crimes division.

Sabo said he is confident an internal investigation will be sufficient to instil faith in the public.

Once completed, the file will be reviewed by the prosecutor's office to determine if there was any criminal wrongdoing. As the matter involved a police service member and a civilian, it will also be forwarded to the provincial complaints investigator's office for review, Sabo said.

He said a coroner's inquest will also likely be called.

The police will issue press releases as the investigation progresses, Sabo said.

"On behalf of all of the members of the Saskatoon Police Service, I extend my heartfelt sympathies to the Moore family. Regardless of the circumstances, the loss of life is a tragedy and we have made our victims services personnel available to the Moore family in order to offer any assistance we can in this, their time of grief," Sabo said.

Moore was a single father with a young son, Dylan. The Moore family has set up a trust fund for Dylan at the Teachers Credit Union on Arlington Avenue. They are asking people to donate to the fund in lieu of flowers for Moore's funeral, which will be held on Wednesday at Park Funeral Chapel.

? The StarPhoenix (Saskatoon) 2004

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Postby marcus » Tue May 04, 2004 9:40 am

Thanks for the updates UofS. From the sounds of that last article about the press conference details, this officer performed very well from start to finish in a very unfortunate and dangerous situation. Hats off to him and he has my prayers and support.

I think about this type of thing all the time, any one of this thugs we deal with might have a handgun tucked away somewhere. Luckily I haven't had to deal with that yet while trying to make an arrest alone but it's scary to think about. I just hope I'll have the time/space/skill to deal with it and walk away.

Ya, ya...I feel for the criminal's family, and it's too bad that a young boy has lost his father......but a goof that pulls a gun on a cop got what he had coming.

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Postby Tactical » Wed May 05, 2004 11:51 am

marcus wrote:......but a goof that pulls a gun on a cop got what he had coming.


AMEN to that.....I wish the constable and his family luck in dealing with what happened!

Tact

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Postby marcus » Tue Mar 15, 2005 11:16 am

Anyone know how the internal investigation and review went? U of S??

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Postby Mark S » Tue Mar 15, 2005 12:55 pm

Pretty good article with good details about what happened. Why is it that in Saskatoon the police can comment on what happened at this stage but in Manitoba they have to keep their mouths shut and allow special interest groups to be the only ones doing the story telling?
Welcome to Winnipeg. We were born here, what's your excuse?

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Postby Redbull » Tue Mar 15, 2005 4:04 pm

Haven't heard anything as of yet, I'll let you know when I do.

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Postby Redbull » Fri May 27, 2005 7:21 pm

A coroner?s inquest into the shooting began this week, I?ll post the articles as they come. Sorry but some of them are long.


Officer feared for life during confrontation
Inquest examines events leading up to shooting death


Lana Haight
The Starphoenix

May 25, 2005

The Saskatoon police officer who shot and killed a man last year testified Tuesday he feared for his own life.
"I thought, 'If this goes on for even one more second, I'm going to get shot,' " said Const. Tim Bayly at a coroner's inquest into the death of Andrew Moore.
On April 30, 2004, Bayly shot Moore, 35, after a pursuit that ended inside the Twenty-Ninth Street Confectionery and Grocery. No criminal charges were laid against Bayly following an investigation by Saskatoon police and a review of the file by Crown prosecutors. The province's chief coroner ordered this week's inquest.
According to testimony Tuesday, Moore had used methamphetamine prior to the shooting. An analysis of his tissue samples showed the drug was still in his system, said Sgt. Al Carlson of the Saskatoon police identification section. A tiny plastic vial found in the pocket of Moore's jeans had crystal meth residue, he added.
Moore was heavily armed as well. He was carrying a Smith and Wesson .357 magnum revolver loaded with six rounds of ammunition. Another 44 bullets were found inside a fanny pack Moore was wearing, testified Carlson.
"He could have fired 50 shots from that handgun, given the opportunity," Carlson said.
The day Moore was shot was not the first time that he and Bayly had met.
While on patrol at about 2:30 p.m. on March 7, 2004, Bayly tried to stop a GMC Blazer speeding along Idylwyld Drive North. The driver, whom Bayly later identified as Moore, got out of the Blazer and pulled a weapon, Bayly testified, adding Moore appeared to be paranoid.
"He wouldn't let me within five feet of him.
"It was like he was ready to explode. He was super tense. If I took a step toward him . . . he would start breathing heavy and glaring."
Moore eventually put the weapon away and walked to the opposite side of the police car, setting his hands on the hood. Before Bayly could make his way around the car, Moore returned to his vehicle and sped away.
Almost two months later, Bayly saw Moore in a telephone booth at Avenue I and 29th Street, just outside the Twenty-Ninth Street Confectionery and Grocery, and prepared to arrest him for the March incident.
"He was so unpredictable and trying to avoid me before. (That) set off a lot of warning bells. I was definitely afraid of this guy," testified the 35-year-old Bayly, who is now in his 12th year with Saskatoon police.
Within two or three minutes, the situation escalated. Moore saw Bayly and moved toward the store, leaning against an outside wall. As the officer approached, Moore lowered his black sunglasses and headed into the building, Bayly said. Moore's right hand was concealed inside his jacket. Bayly followed Moore and told him he was under arrest.
"He said, 'Just leave me alone or someone is going to get hurt,' " recounted Bayly. It was a warning Moore repeated throughout the next couple of minutes.
The officer tried to subdue Moore with pepper spray by targeting his face, but it was ineffective because his eyes were protected by the sunglasses, testified Bayly, who said he also warned Moore that he had a gun in hopes Moore would give in. Instead, Moore headed to the back of the store but found the door locked. When he bent down to unlatch the door, Bayly said he grabbed Moore from behind and caught him in a bear hug. The 6-foot-2 officer, who towered over the 5-foot-8 Moore, saw the man had a gun. It was pointing toward Moore's stomach. Bayly said he was afraid that if the gun went off, it would go through both of them.
The officer was also concerned about the safety of the owners of the confectionery, who were at the back of the store. While trying to move Moore to the front door, Bayly lost his grip on Moore. The gun was now an inch away from the officer's stomach.
"I was about to be shot," said Bayly in explaining why he shot Moore in the left cheek.
"I felt I had run out of time and out of options. In fact, I thought I had waited too long."
In more than two hours of testimony, Bayly also described his training in control techniques, the use of force and firearms.
Also testifying on Tuesday was Kenneth Brokofsky, a civilian who was riding with Const. James Wilde, the police officer called to back-up Bayly at the confectionery.
After they arrived at the store, Wilde headed to the back while Brokofsky went inside, he said. Brokofsky found Moore and Bayly wrestling and heading toward the front of the store, and saw Moore holding a gun.
"At that point, I decided I was in the wrong spot. I ran to the front door," testified Brokofsky, Wilde's brother-in-law.
He heard Bayly telling Moore to drop the gun and Moore telling Bayly that someone was going to get hurt. Then he heard a gun shot and saw Moore fall to the floor.
The purpose of an inquest is not to find fault but to inform the public of circumstances surrounding a death or to determine what could be done differently to avoid potential deaths, coroner Doug Kovatch said at the start of the inquest on Tuesday morning.
"It is not the purpose of the inquest to decide if someone did something wrong or if someone should be compensated," he told the three men and three women selected as jurors.
They will be charged with making recommendations following the testimony, which could last two or three days. The coroner's counsel, Debbie Black, may call as many as 12 witnesses, including Moore's brother and a couple of his friends.

? The StarPhoenix (Saskatoon) 2005

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Postby Redbull » Mon May 30, 2005 11:25 pm

Juror questions need to use deadly force
Witness's version of events differs from other testimony



Lana Haight
The StarPhoenix

Thursday, May 26, 2005

A juror at a Saskatoon coroner's inquest is apparently questioning whether a city police officer needed to shoot and kill the man he was trying to arrest.
On April 30, 2004, Const. Tim Bayly fatally shot 35-year-old Andrew Moore at a convenience store on the city's west side. Bayly was trying to arrest Moore for a previous incident that involved a high-speed chase.
On Tuesday, Bayly testified that he felt he had run out of options inside the convenience store because Moore had a loaded revolver in his hand and there were civilians nearby. For a day and a half, several witnesses have supported Bayly's testimony.
However, Tyler Drury told the inquest late Wednesday afternoon that police didn't have to shoot Moore, who was his roommate. One of the jurors, exercising his right to question witnesses at the inquest, stopped Drury before he left the stand.
"He (Moore) wouldn't have been the kind of guy to pull a trigger on a cop anyways," said the juror, who appears to be in his 20s.
An emotional Drury shook his head, and as he began to answer 'No,' the juror added, "Thanks. I didn't think so."
Earlier in his testimony, Drury said he and Moore were using the pay phone just outside the Twenty-Ninth Street Confectionery and Grocery. They had run out of money, couldn't pay the rent and had nowhere to go. Drury said he was talking on the telephone with his dad, who farms near Melfort, when a police car pulled up. Drury said about 10 minutes later, a couple more police cars arrived. One officer ran to the back of the confectionery and then entered the front door.
"They went straight after Andy. . . . They were all excited -- the policemen. They were pumped. Andy backed into the store.
"Just when I hung up the phone, that's when I heard the gunshot. I walked away from the pay phone. I walked away. There was nothing I could do to help," continued Drury.
He also testified that Moore hadn't had methamphetamine, also known as crystal meth, for about a week before the shooting, that Moore used the illegal street drug only occasionally, and that Moore didn't show any symptoms of meth use such as paranoia, hallucinations and delusions.
Drury's version of the events leading up to and including the night of the shooting was significantly different from other testimony.
Terry Nameth, another of Moore's friends, said Moore carried a revolver because he believed people were chasing him.
Nameth also told of incident when Moore showed signs of paranoia.
"He thought he saw the police and he started running. He said, 'Come on. Come on,' and he ran all the way back to the house," said Nameth, who was escorted to the inquest by two RCMP officers.
In January, a Regina judge sentenced Nameth to three years in prison for trafficking in crystal meth. The charge stems from March 2004 when he was leaving Saskatoon after visiting Moore and Drury, who lived at 514 Ave. G North.
Bayly stopped Nameth and seized from his vehicle 218 grams of crystal meth and a sawed-off shotgun. A subsequent search of his Regina home turned up another 16 grams of meth, real and counterfeit money, ammunition and guns.
Nameth testified on Wednesday that the crystal meth seized from his vehicle did not come from Moore or Drury.
He said he was concerned about Moore's health because he wasn't eating enough and was losing weight, a common problem among meth users.
A toxicology report entered as evidence at the inquest shows Moore had crystal meth in his system at the time of the shooting.
Most of Wednesday's testimony came from the two Saskatoon police officers from the major crimes unit who were responsible for investigating the shooting.
In an interview, Sgt. Leonard Mann said Bayly did not receive preferential treatment during the investigation because he was a police officer. He added investigators didn't do anything differently as they gathered evidence. Anyone questioning the integrity of the investigation should go through the testimony provided at the inquest, he said.
"They have to listen to the evidence and how the investigation was done and make up their own minds," said Mann outside court.
Mann told the inquest that because police officers are rarely involved in fatal shootings, as lead investigator, he checked the Saskatoon Police Service policy manual when assigned the file to ensure he was following procedure.
The 25-year veteran of the force said he needed to corroborate the statements given by the witnesses and the physical evidence at the confectionery with Bayly's account of the shooting.
The witnesses to the shooting were separated to prevent them from discussing the events. Downtown, other officers conducted videotaped interviews with them, which Mann and his partner, Sgt. Glenn Cox, later reviewed.
Mann described how he walked around the store, looking for clues and trying to establish the sequence of events. He noted the faint smell of pepper spray, saw scuff marks on a portion of the floor indicating a struggle and observed the angle of the wound where the bullet entered Moore's head. All the while, he asked himself, "Do I need to probe a little bit further? Is there something someone's not saying?" he testified.
Even though Mann and Cox had wanted to interview Bayly the night of the shooting, they waited until the next day because Bayly wanted to talk to a lawyer first. Mann said he and Cox discussed Bayly's request to delay the interview before agreeing to it.
"It was consistent with how we would handle any other death," said Mann at the inquest.
Mann testified that in the early morning hours of May 1, he and Cox were responsible for telling Moore's parents that a police officer had just shot their son.
"They were two of the most co-operative and understanding people. They have been nothing but helpful (during the investigation)."
In addition to hearing Wednesday's testimony, jurors watched a video re-enactment of the incident. Bayly recounted how he called for another officer to back him up. He showed how he pepper-sprayed Moore and followed him into the confectionery. When he lost sight of Moore at the back of the store, the officer pulled his gun. When he found Moore trying to escape through the locked back door, he grabbed him from behind and tried to move him to the front and out of the building. During their struggle, Moore's hand came loose and he pointed his revolver at Bayly's abdomen. The officer said in the video that he believed he had to shoot and kill Moore.
Mann testified that for Bayly to kill Moore instantaneously, he had to shoot him in the head.
Mann also said he forwarded all the documents, photos and videos relating to the investigation to a Crown prosecutor in Regina, who determined Bayly should not be charged.
Nameth also told of an incident when Moore showed signs of paranoia.
"He thought he saw the police and he started running. He said, 'Come on. Come on,' and he ran all the way back to the house," said Nameth, who was escorted to the inquest by two RCMP officers.
In January, a Regina judge sentenced Nameth to three years in prison for trafficking in crystal meth. The charge stems from March 2004 when he was leaving Saskatoon after visiting Moore and Drury, who lived at 514 Ave. G North.
Bayly stopped Nameth and seized from his vehicle 218 grams of crystal meth and a sawed-off shotgun. A subsequent search of his Regina home turned up another 16 grams of meth, real and counterfeit money, ammunition and guns.
Nameth testified on Wednesday that the crystal meth seized from his vehicle did not come from Moore or Drury.
He said he was concerned about Moore's health because he wasn't eating enough and was losing weight, a common problem among meth users.
A toxicology report entered as evidence at the inquest shows Moore had crystal meth in his system at the time of the shooting.
Most of Wednesday's testimony came from the two Saskatoon police officers from the major crimes unit who were responsible for investigating the shooting.
In an interview, Sgt. Leonard Mann said Bayly did not receive preferential treatment during the investigation because he was a police officer. He added investigators didn't do anything differently as they gathered evidence. Anyone questioning the integrity of the investigation should go through the testimony provided at the inquest, he said.
"They have to listen to the evidence and how the investigation was done and make up their own minds," said Mann outside court.
Mann told the inquest that because police officers are rarely involved in fatal shootings, as lead investigator, he checked the Saskatoon Police Service policy manual when assigned the file to ensure he was following procedure.
The 25-year veteran of the force said he needed to corroborate the statements given by the witnesses and the physical evidence at the confectionery with Bayly's account of the shooting.
The witnesses to the shooting were separated to prevent them from discussing the events. Downtown, other officers conducted videotaped interviews with them, which Mann and his partner, Sgt. Glenn Cox, later reviewed.
Mann described how he walked around the store, looking for clues and trying to establish the sequence of events. He noted the faint smell of pepper spray, saw scuff marks on a portion of the floor indicating a struggle and observed the angle of the wound where the bullet entered Moore's head. All the while, he asked himself, "Do I need to probe a little bit further? Is there something someone's not saying?" he testified.
Even though Mann and Cox had wanted to interview Bayly the night of the shooting, they waited until the next day because Bayly wanted to talk to a lawyer first. Mann said he and Cox discussed Bayly's request to delay the interview before agreeing to it.
"It was consistent with how we would handle any other death," said Mann at the inquest.
Mann testified that in the early morning hours of May 1, he and Cox told Moore's parents that a police officer had just shot their son.
In addition to hearing Wednesday's testimony, jurors watched a video re-enactment of the incident. Bayly recounted how he called for another officer to back him up. He showed how he pepper-sprayed Moore and followed him into the confectionery. When he lost sight of Moore at the back of the store, the officer pulled his gun. When he found Moore trying to escape through the locked back door, he grabbed him from behind and tried to move him to the front and out of the building. During their struggle, Moore's hand came loose and he pointed his revolver at Bayly's abdomen. The officer said in the video that he believed he had to shoot and kill Moore.
Mann testified that for Bayly to kill Moore instantaneously, he had to shoot him in the head.
Mann also said he forwarded all of the documents, photos and videos relating to the investigation to a Crown prosecutor in Regina, who determined Bayly should not be charged.

? The StarPhoenix (Saskatoon) 2005

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Postby Redbull » Mon May 30, 2005 11:29 pm

This is from testimony from the brother. It is a better picture then the (probable) drug addict friend from the previous post painted.

Jury hears of crystal meth toll
Brother says addiction ruined Moore's life


Lana Haight
The StarPhoenix

May 27, 2005

The brother of a man fatally shot by a Saskatoon police officer last year told a coroner's inquest that he watched helplessly as his brother's addiction to crystal meth ruined his life.
"It was recreational in the beginning and he just got hooked on it," David Moore testified Thursday. "They say that nine of out 10 who try it get hooked."
Andrew Moore, 35, was carrying a powerful revolver that was loaded when Const. Tim Bayly shot and killed him on April 30, 2004, inside the Twenty-Ninth Street Confectionery and Grocery. Bayly was trying to arrest Moore for evading him and speeding in the city's north end in the middle of the night several weeks earlier.
An emotional David Moore testified at the inquest that his brother had used crystal meth, an illegal street drug, for about two years before his death. He quickly moved from a recreational user to one who used the drug to stay awake while driving truck.
"I tried to help him with it but he said he had it under control. Apparently he didn't," said Moore, who frequently wiped his eyes and sighed deeply while in the witness stand.
When Andrew's trucking boss learned of his addiction in the summer of 2003, he was fired. He also lost his home, the relationship with his girlfriend ended and family relations became strained. Andrew developed severe paranoia, testified Moore.
When a vehicle came along side Andrew's truck, he would hold a piece of paper next to his face to prevent police from videotaping him, which he believed they were trying to do.
"He always thought people were following him even though nobody was following him," said Moore.
David and Andrew, who was two years older, were good friends until the addiction took control, David said. Growing up, they loved camping, fishing and hunting with their dad. Together as teenagers, they took hunter and firearms safety courses at the Saskatoon police station, Moore testified. They also knew and spent time with police officers as their family was friends with other families where the fathers were officers, he added.
For Andrew to own a prohibited weapon and carry it around with him went against all that he was taught, said his brother.
"Andy was never the kind of person to carry a gun. For him to do what he did was a contradiction. He was raised around guns. He knew better than to do shit like that."
David Moore lost contact with his brother in August 2003 after the two had argued about Andrew's drug addiction.
"He became very angry with people who loved him, and people who didn't give a crap about him, he became closer," said Moore.
"He didn't want to be with anyone who cared."
Moore testified that when his parents went looking for help, none of the agencies they contacted knew much about crystal meth. It's a drug that only surfaced in the city in 2001, according to other testimony heard Thursday.
In that year, Saskatoon police laid four charges related to crystal meth. In 2002, the number of charges went up to nine. The following year, five times as many charges were laid for a total of 47. And last year, there was a four-fold increase to 167. In January of 2005, 12 charges were laid.
This sharp increase worries Sgt. Jerome Engele of the Saskatoon integrated drug unit.
"Once (people) are really into using crystal meth, nothing matters. They will do anything to get their crystal meth," he testified at the inquest.
Earlier in the day, the three-man, three-woman jury were told that Bayly made the correct decision when he shot Andrew Moore in the head to kill him instantly.
"The longer this incident goes on, it becomes more apparent that the subject is not going to put the weapon down," said Staff Sgt. Sandy Ervin, a training officer with the RCMP in Regina.
In explaining the national use of force model used by many police departments across Canada, Ervin said a police officer is continually assessing the characteristics a suspect is displaying as well as the environment they're in.
As the situation escalated so did the need for a stronger show of force, said Ervin, who concluded that Bayly had few options available to him in the confectionery. Ervin testified that if Bayly had backed off and not pursued Moore, Moore could have taken the store's owners as hostages. And while a police officer's duty to protect the public from harm and death includes protecting those they are arresting, Ervin said Bayly had to weigh consequences of killing Moore or allowing Moore the opportunity to kill Bayly and the others in the store.

? The StarPhoenix (Saskatoon) 2005

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Postby Redbull » Mon May 30, 2005 11:33 pm

Last one, the recommendations from the jury in the inquest. Again sorry about the length of the posts.



City needs drug rehab centre, coroner's jury recommends

Lana Haight
of The StarPhoenix

Saturday, May 28, 2005

Saskatchewan needs a long-term drug rehabilitation centre where the justice system can detain addicts for treatment, a coroner's jury said Friday.
On Friday, the three-man, three-woman jury looking into the shooting death of a Saskatoon man by a city police officer recommended ways to treat drug addicts, changes to how Saskatoon police officers do their jobs, especially in dangerous areas in the city, and more education on the risks of drug use, specifically that of methamphetamine, an illegal street drug also called crystal meth.
Andrew Moore, 35, was fatally shot on April 30, 2004, by Const. Tim Bayly after a brief struggle inside the Twenty-Ninth Street Confectionery and Grocery. At one point during the scuffle, Moore pointed a loaded .357 magnum revolver at Bayly's stomach. Bayly reacted by shooting Moore once in the head, killing him instantly.
The jury heard from Moore's brother, David Moore, who said Andrew started using crystal meth about two years before the shooting and was addicted to it. He also testified that Andrew was extremely paranoid, a characteristic of a meth addict, and was known to carry the prohibited revolver, despite being brought up to respect firearms.
Moore told the inquest that his parents tried to get help for Andrew but none of the agencies they contacted knew much about crystal meth. And he expressed disappointment that the Saskatchewan government does not fund a long-term residential treatment facility for crystal meth addicts.
Many of the jury's recommendations, including one that would give the justice system the power to compel addicts into treatment, echo suggestions made at the inquest by the lawyer representing the Saskatoon police service.
"People who testified including the family member who testified indicated that it was a problem getting people particularly who are suffering the effects of crystal meth to agree to go into a treatment facility," lawyer Greg Bains said outside the courthouse.
"The jury obviously felt that additional steps should be taken to allow the justice system to have that person placed into treatment when the circumstances require it."
The jury recommended that the new drug treatment centre or centres be "closed-custody" facilities.
But the coroner's counsel, Debbie Black, was disappointed the recommendation regarding treatment didn't address crystal meth specifically.
"As we heard from several of the witnesses, there is no crystal meth treatment in Saskatchewan. It is a very serious problem. I think we heard from the witnesses that crystal meth treatment requires a great deal of time (18 months). Apparently, there may be treatment available in Alberta," she told reporters.
During the four-day inquest, jurors were told the only long-term drug and alcohol residential facility in Saskatchewan is the relatively new non-profit, faith-based Prairie Hope Centre located east of Saskatoon, near Allan.
Another of the jury's recommendations says medical professionals should report suspected drug users to the justice system.
Saskatchewan Health will consider the recommendations, according to a spokesperson with the department.
The jurors also made several recommendations for the Saskatoon Police Service.
They want two-person patrols in areas where more than one officer is required, and they want those officers to have Tasers, a weapon that delivers an electrical jolt and stuns the target.
Changing the law to allow police officers to charge a person with a large quantity of one of the substances needed to produce illicit drugs was also recommended by the jurors.
The jurors also recommended that officers receive training in identifying and dealing with drug users and that communication be improved among police officers when they have information about suspects. And they want more public education on the dangers of crystal meth, specifically, and drug use, in general.
Saskatoon police need a couple of weeks to study the jury's recommendations, says acting Insp. Neil Wylie.
"The (department) will give some serious thought to how we can implement them and what type of impact it would have on the organization overall," he said in an interview.
The jury's recommendations will be forwarded to Saskatchewan Justice, which will distribute them to the appropriate agencies.

? The StarPhoenix (Saskatoon) 2005

Gerg
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Postby Gerg » Sun Jun 05, 2005 6:16 pm

All the best to the officer and his family.

Thanks for the updates UofS.
Failure; Sometimes the meaning of life is to serve as a warning for others......

marcus
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Postby marcus » Tue Jun 07, 2005 4:55 pm

I echo Gerg's message. Thanks U of S.

Just a question, which Sask municipal forces (I know there are quite a few, large and small) outfit their members with Tasers?


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