Applying to Correctional Service Canada

Discuss the educational and physical requirements, testing process and background phase involved in the hiring process. Includes the experiences and advice of current and past applicants. All agency application related questions belong here.

greenpea19
Rookie Member
Posts: 15
Joined: Fri Oct 18, 2019 9:59 pm
Contact:

Re: Applying to Correctional Service Canada

Postby greenpea19 » Tue Nov 05, 2019 8:18 pm

Great thank you!

conjuringdreams
Rookie Member
Posts: 7
Joined: Sun Dec 17, 2017 2:41 pm
Contact:

Re: Applying to Correctional Service Canada

Postby conjuringdreams » Fri Nov 08, 2019 12:54 pm

Hi guys,

CSC emailed me today asking me to submit to them possible times I could come in for an interview. Does that mean I passed my SJT exam?

denstradamus
Rookie Member
Posts: 7
Joined: Wed Oct 16, 2019 11:56 am
Contact:

Re: Applying to Correctional Service Canada

Postby denstradamus » Fri Nov 08, 2019 1:40 pm

conjuringdreams wrote:
Fri Nov 08, 2019 12:54 pm
Hi guys,

CSC emailed me today asking me to submit to them possible times I could come in for an interview. Does that mean I passed my SJT exam?
That sounds about right! When I wrote my exam in Vancouver back in late July, they emailed my results a week later. Then they scheduled me for an interview in late September. I didn't have a choice of dates/time so you are lucky!

Hopeful-1
Rookie Member
Posts: 11
Joined: Thu Dec 10, 2015 3:27 pm
Contact:

Re: Applying to Correctional Service Canada

Postby Hopeful-1 » Fri Nov 08, 2019 2:32 pm

Hello again.

Sorry for the bother but I’d like to hear some feedback from some COs on the changes happening within CSC. And if my questions don’t make sense it because I’m writing this after a 14hr graveyard shift.

I’ve been interested in the job and researching this career very thoroughly lately, but to be honest, everything I’m finding is quite negative and alarming (my opinion). I get it, COs deal with bad people and bad people are capable of heinous things. I fully understand the dangers and risks associated with the career. With that said what’s concerning me most now is the articles I’m reading on the needle exchange program and the elimination of solitary confinement as a means of punishment. From the outside looking in, it now seems like this job has become increasingly dangerous and the means of protecting ones health and well being are not keeping up in suit. It seems like offenders have more rights than COs and officers are increasingly losing their power/ability to do anything about it. I’m wondering how this job and the changes happening are affecting COs physical and mental health? How’s it affecting your spouse? Your children?

I ask these things not as a means of putting down CSC or COs or to paint a bad picture on the career, I’m just the type of person who likes to be informed on what I’m getting into.

If I offend with these questions, I apologize. It’s not my intent. My goal is to have as clear of a picture as to what’s going on and the direction the organization is going as I continue with applying. So if anyone wants to chime in and share their thoughts or opinions on these issues or possibly change my mind opinion on them.....or on other issues they’d like to bring up I would like to be part of that discussion. PMs are good too as I don’t want anyone to get in trouble for voicing an opinion.

Again, thanks to those who answer.
Rigaud - Aug 2017 - withdrawl injured during CDT

greenpea19
Rookie Member
Posts: 15
Joined: Fri Oct 18, 2019 9:59 pm
Contact:

Re: Applying to Correctional Service Canada

Postby greenpea19 » Fri Nov 08, 2019 3:28 pm

For security do we do a security interview on the phone?

greenpea19
Rookie Member
Posts: 15
Joined: Fri Oct 18, 2019 9:59 pm
Contact:

Re: Applying to Correctional Service Canada

Postby greenpea19 » Fri Nov 08, 2019 3:41 pm

greenpea19 wrote:
Fri Nov 08, 2019 3:28 pm
For security do we do a security interview on the phone?
And do we get an email if we fail or pass?

JACX
Rookie Member
Posts: 49
Joined: Sun Oct 06, 2019 11:07 pm
Contact:

Re: Applying to Correctional Service Canada

Postby JACX » Fri Nov 08, 2019 6:30 pm

greenpea19 wrote:
Fri Nov 08, 2019 3:41 pm
greenpea19 wrote:
Fri Nov 08, 2019 3:28 pm
For security do we do a security interview on the phone?
And do we get an email if we fail or pass?
They phoned me and asked me a few questions. I was never told if I passed or failed.
JACX

Applied: Jan. 2019
Testing: completed previously.
Interview: July 2019
References: Aug. 2019
Fingerprinting, med:Sept 2019
CTP1: Sept 2019-Oct. 2019
Psych + interview: Oct 2019
Audiogram:Completed
CTP2:TBD
CTP3:TBD

Dk94
Rookie Member
Posts: 30
Joined: Mon Sep 23, 2019 12:39 pm
Contact:

Re: Applying to Correctional Service Canada

Postby Dk94 » Sat Nov 09, 2019 9:15 pm

I'm in the early stages of ctp1 in pacific, I noticed some individuals complete different stages of the process at different times. Are the differences in the process a regional thing or is there no rhyme or reason? I have only completed interview/references and testing.

hockeyguy
Rookie Member
Posts: 10
Joined: Sun Feb 17, 2019 8:40 pm
Contact:

Re: Applying to Correctional Service Canada

Postby hockeyguy » Sat Nov 09, 2019 9:47 pm

noanykey wrote:
Tue Oct 22, 2019 9:46 am
Psych is an interesting thing. You get personality tests followed by an interview. During the interview they go over the results and they found something about me. I agreed, we talked, I went to background check.
There was one guy here who unfortunately dodged some questions and he has to wait 2 years. Will not mention names but his story is in this thread.

I didn't pass CTP 3, I only got 2 months in before my strikes. But CTP 3 is a hell of a lotta fun. But extremely eye opening because of one video you'll watch called 'blood in the cells'

If you have anyone has questions, feel free to PM. I'm no help in Shotguns, 40mm, spray, and I will not divulge into the details of DBT's.
I'm probs going to reattempt the BC Sheriff Service and put my hat in for Provincial CO as the jails are incredibly closer than Kent for experience before attempting CSC again, but I will help out applicants to CSC as best as I can. I was in Kingston for training.
Yeah, it's called bloody cells and it's on youtube.

User avatar
Kevlar
Rookie Member
Posts: 36
Joined: Fri Feb 17, 2012 4:08 am
Location: PRA
Contact:

Re: Applying to Correctional Service Canada

Postby Kevlar » Sun Nov 10, 2019 4:13 am

Hopeful-1 wrote:
Fri Nov 08, 2019 2:32 pm
Hello again.

Sorry for the bother but I’d like to hear some feedback from some COs on the changes happening within CSC. And if my questions don’t make sense it because I’m writing this after a 14hr graveyard shift.

I’ve been interested in the job and researching this career very thoroughly lately, but to be honest, everything I’m finding is quite negative and alarming (my opinion). I get it, COs deal with bad people and bad people are capable of heinous things. I fully understand the dangers and risks associated with the career. With that said what’s concerning me most now is the articles I’m reading on the needle exchange program and the elimination of solitary confinement as a means of punishment. From the outside looking in, it now seems like this job has become increasingly dangerous and the means of protecting ones health and well being are not keeping up in suit. It seems like offenders have more rights than COs and officers are increasingly losing their power/ability to do anything about it. I’m wondering how this job and the changes happening are affecting COs physical and mental health? How’s it affecting your spouse? Your children?

I ask these things not as a means of putting down CSC or COs or to paint a bad picture on the career, I’m just the type of person who likes to be informed on what I’m getting into.

If I offend with these questions, I apologize. It’s not my intent. My goal is to have as clear of a picture as to what’s going on and the direction the organization is going as I continue with applying. So if anyone wants to chime in and share their thoughts or opinions on these issues or possibly change my mind opinion on them.....or on other issues they’d like to bring up I would like to be part of that discussion. PMs are good too as I don’t want anyone to get in trouble for voicing an opinion.

Again, thanks to those who answer.

Good for you for asking these questions up front.

I have trained dozens and dozens of recruits on OJT and for the most part they make it through alright but for some its a quick realization that this was not the job for them.

I will start off with this:

You get paid to protect the lives of some of the worst people to walk the earth, that society wants to forget and you will do this against potentially your own morals because it is what you were sworn to do and its what you are required to do. Saving the lives of multiple multiple conviction pedophiles is not exactly high up on anyones wishlist but youll do it because its what youre sometimes required to do. You will see blood, you will see beatings. You will see stabbings and hangings and everything in between. Unless you ship off to a minimum security right out of depot of course which is both highly unlikely and yet still has those potentials (Ive seen some rough stuff moonlighting at a minimum lol)

There is a potential for staff assaults, up to and including homicide, hostage takings, drug exposures, getting infected with a variety of diseases.

You will do all of this because you are a good person who wants to serve their country and do a good job, and you will do all of this while recieving zero recognition, almost always, all the while being stereotyped by the media, the public, and being judged and criticized by your peers and by management.

I have done this job since 2010, and have seen enough stuff to fill a big screen documentary by michael moore for days.

Do I think the direction of the CSC has changed over the last 10 years? Absolutely. Do I feel like it has made our job more dangerous? Absolutely. But... and this is a very big but... a very subjective but....

...I do not regret my time in the CSC. The skills I aquired and the things I learned I was capable of were absolutely invaluable. Was it absolutely brutal on my mental health? Absolutely it was. Was it brutal on my relationship with my spouse whom I was with prior to starting and saw the changes it made in me? Absolutely. Were the proper resources available to me when I needed help when I started? Absolutely NOT. These days however there is much more emphasis on taking care of your mental health. The stigma of asking for help, albeit still exists and is rampant, has diminished to the point where you actually can ask for help without having your entire crew disowning you.

I would encourage every new recruit as I have always taught them on OJT to always ask for help when they cant seem to shake that anxious emptiness that is with them when they go to bed and rolls over with them when they wake up.

The resources available outside the institution have increased 10 fold since I started and doctors are taking it very seriously. Its so much easier to feel better if you hit those symptoms early instead of waiting for the day after you look at yourself in the bathroom mirror wondering why you cant leave the house except to get groceries at the only 24 hour Safeway in a 200km radius, and wanting to throw up at the thought of going in for another shift of death and despair.

Ive never been one to sugar coat anything. This job is not like most people think. Some officers go through their entire career and dont see much of anything. Others seem to be the great atrocity magnet. I can speak to everything I have written here and just want to make sure people have a full idea from someone inside the walls that the potential is there.

Complacency is the most dangerous word in the CSC. If you allow yourself and your team to be complacent, thats when the changes that have happened become truly dangerous. Your Union is fighting hard for you, but at the end of the day you decide where you put your hands and you decide what to say or not say.

Hope this helps.

K.

And BTW the hiring process is way easier than the CBSA so if you made it through that this one is a lot less intense.
CBSA Ap
Applied: 2018/09/28
OTEE: 2018/10 - PASS 95%
INTERVIEW 2018/11 - PASS
Psych Eval / Interview: 2019/04 - PASS
Medical: 2019/05 - PASS
PARE: 2019/11 - PASS
Security Checks: Started 2019/04 - Granted 2019/10
OITP:?
Rigaud:?

Hopeful-1
Rookie Member
Posts: 11
Joined: Thu Dec 10, 2015 3:27 pm
Contact:

Re: Applying to Correctional Service Canada

Postby Hopeful-1 » Sun Nov 10, 2019 10:03 am

Kevlar wrote:
Sun Nov 10, 2019 4:13 am
Hopeful-1 wrote:
Fri Nov 08, 2019 2:32 pm
Hello again.

Sorry for the bother but I’d like to hear some feedback from some COs on the changes happening within CSC. And if my questions don’t make sense it because I’m writing this after a 14hr graveyard shift.

I’ve been interested in the job and researching this career very thoroughly lately, but to be honest, everything I’m finding is quite negative and alarming (my opinion). I get it, COs deal with bad people and bad people are capable of heinous things. I fully understand the dangers and risks associated with the career. With that said what’s concerning me most now is the articles I’m reading on the needle exchange program and the elimination of solitary confinement as a means of punishment. From the outside looking in, it now seems like this job has become increasingly dangerous and the means of protecting ones health and well being are not keeping up in suit. It seems like offenders have more rights than COs and officers are increasingly losing their power/ability to do anything about it. I’m wondering how this job and the changes happening are affecting COs physical and mental health? How’s it affecting your spouse? Your children?

I ask these things not as a means of putting down CSC or COs or to paint a bad picture on the career, I’m just the type of person who likes to be informed on what I’m getting into.

If I offend with these questions, I apologize. It’s not my intent. My goal is to have as clear of a picture as to what’s going on and the direction the organization is going as I continue with applying. So if anyone wants to chime in and share their thoughts or opinions on these issues or possibly change my mind opinion on them.....or on other issues they’d like to bring up I would like to be part of that discussion. PMs are good too as I don’t want anyone to get in trouble for voicing an opinion.

Again, thanks to those who answer.

Good for you for asking these questions up front.

I have trained dozens and dozens of recruits on OJT and for the most part they make it through alright but for some its a quick realization that this was not the job for them.

I will start off with this:

You get paid to protect the lives of some of the worst people to walk the earth, that society wants to forget and you will do this against potentially your own morals because it is what you were sworn to do and its what you are required to do. Saving the lives of multiple multiple conviction pedophiles is not exactly high up on anyones wishlist but youll do it because its what youre sometimes required to do. You will see blood, you will see beatings. You will see stabbings and hangings and everything in between. Unless you ship off to a minimum security right out of depot of course which is both highly unlikely and yet still has those potentials (Ive seen some rough stuff moonlighting at a minimum lol)

There is a potential for staff assaults, up to and including homicide, hostage takings, drug exposures, getting infected with a variety of diseases.

You will do all of this because you are a good person who wants to serve their country and do a good job, and you will do all of this while recieving zero recognition, almost always, all the while being stereotyped by the media, the public, and being judged and criticized by your peers and by management.

I have done this job since 2010, and have seen enough stuff to fill a big screen documentary by michael moore for days.

Do I think the direction of the CSC has changed over the last 10 years? Absolutely. Do I feel like it has made our job more dangerous? Absolutely. But... and this is a very big but... a very subjective but....

...I do not regret my time in the CSC. The skills I aquired and the things I learned I was capable of were absolutely invaluable. Was it absolutely brutal on my mental health? Absolutely it was. Was it brutal on my relationship with my spouse whom I was with prior to starting and saw the changes it made in me? Absolutely. Were the proper resources available to me when I needed help when I started? Absolutely NOT. These days however there is much more emphasis on taking care of your mental health. The stigma of asking for help, albeit still exists and is rampant, has diminished to the point where you actually can ask for help without having your entire crew disowning you.

I would encourage every new recruit as I have always taught them on OJT to always ask for help when they cant seem to shake that anxious emptiness that is with them when they go to bed and rolls over with them when they wake up.

The resources available outside the institution have increased 10 fold since I started and doctors are taking it very seriously. Its so much easier to feel better if you hit those symptoms early instead of waiting for the day after you look at yourself in the bathroom mirror wondering why you cant leave the house except to get groceries at the only 24 hour Safeway in a 200km radius, and wanting to throw up at the thought of going in for another shift of death and despair.

Ive never been one to sugar coat anything. This job is not like most people think. Some officers go through their entire career and dont see much of anything. Others seem to be the great atrocity magnet. I can speak to everything I have written here and just want to make sure people have a full idea from someone inside the walls that the potential is there.

Complacency is the most dangerous word in the CSC. If you allow yourself and your team to be complacent, thats when the changes that have happened become truly dangerous. Your Union is fighting hard for you, but at the end of the day you decide where you put your hands and you decide what to say or not say.

Hope this helps.

K.

And BTW the hiring process is way easier than the CBSA so if you made it through that this one is a lot less intense.
Thank you for the great response. These answers are a great help. This is a career I can see myself doing but I guess my main struggles with it right now are personal. I have a hard time with the thought of bringing something home that affects my kids or wife, or having something happen that affects my ability to earn a living for them. I’ve always wanted a career in law enforcement and I almost achieved it, minus a bad luck incident in training. I guess for now I’m going to keep researching and thinking about whether this is for me or not. Again, thanks for the comments and hopefully more will chime in. I think it’s great to have a good dialogue on conversations like these. This forum is a fantastic tool. I appreciate everyone on it.
Rigaud - Aug 2017 - withdrawl injured during CDT

User avatar
noanykey
Rookie Member
Posts: 37
Joined: Thu Apr 02, 2015 5:40 pm
Location: BC
Contact:

Re: Applying to Correctional Service Canada

Postby noanykey » Sun Nov 10, 2019 12:46 pm

Hopeful-1 wrote:
Sun Nov 10, 2019 10:03 am
Kevlar wrote:
Sun Nov 10, 2019 4:13 am
Hopeful-1 wrote:
Fri Nov 08, 2019 2:32 pm
Hello again.

Sorry for the bother but I’d like to hear some feedback from some COs on the changes happening within CSC. And if my questions don’t make sense it because I’m writing this after a 14hr graveyard shift.

I’ve been interested in the job and researching this career very thoroughly lately, but to be honest, everything I’m finding is quite negative and alarming (my opinion). I get it, COs deal with bad people and bad people are capable of heinous things. I fully understand the dangers and risks associated with the career. With that said what’s concerning me most now is the articles I’m reading on the needle exchange program and the elimination of solitary confinement as a means of punishment. From the outside looking in, it now seems like this job has become increasingly dangerous and the means of protecting ones health and well being are not keeping up in suit. It seems like offenders have more rights than COs and officers are increasingly losing their power/ability to do anything about it. I’m wondering how this job and the changes happening are affecting COs physical and mental health? How’s it affecting your spouse? Your children?

I ask these things not as a means of putting down CSC or COs or to paint a bad picture on the career, I’m just the type of person who likes to be informed on what I’m getting into.

If I offend with these questions, I apologize. It’s not my intent. My goal is to have as clear of a picture as to what’s going on and the direction the organization is going as I continue with applying. So if anyone wants to chime in and share their thoughts or opinions on these issues or possibly change my mind opinion on them.....or on other issues they’d like to bring up I would like to be part of that discussion. PMs are good too as I don’t want anyone to get in trouble for voicing an opinion.

Again, thanks to those who answer.

Good for you for asking these questions up front.

I have trained dozens and dozens of recruits on OJT and for the most part they make it through alright but for some its a quick realization that this was not the job for them.

I will start off with this:

You get paid to protect the lives of some of the worst people to walk the earth, that society wants to forget and you will do this against potentially your own morals because it is what you were sworn to do and its what you are required to do. Saving the lives of multiple multiple conviction pedophiles is not exactly high up on anyones wishlist but youll do it because its what youre sometimes required to do. You will see blood, you will see beatings. You will see stabbings and hangings and everything in between. Unless you ship off to a minimum security right out of depot of course which is both highly unlikely and yet still has those potentials (Ive seen some rough stuff moonlighting at a minimum lol)

There is a potential for staff assaults, up to and including homicide, hostage takings, drug exposures, getting infected with a variety of diseases.

You will do all of this because you are a good person who wants to serve their country and do a good job, and you will do all of this while recieving zero recognition, almost always, all the while being stereotyped by the media, the public, and being judged and criticized by your peers and by management.

I have done this job since 2010, and have seen enough stuff to fill a big screen documentary by michael moore for days.

Do I think the direction of the CSC has changed over the last 10 years? Absolutely. Do I feel like it has made our job more dangerous? Absolutely. But... and this is a very big but... a very subjective but....

...I do not regret my time in the CSC. The skills I aquired and the things I learned I was capable of were absolutely invaluable. Was it absolutely brutal on my mental health? Absolutely it was. Was it brutal on my relationship with my spouse whom I was with prior to starting and saw the changes it made in me? Absolutely. Were the proper resources available to me when I needed help when I started? Absolutely NOT. These days however there is much more emphasis on taking care of your mental health. The stigma of asking for help, albeit still exists and is rampant, has diminished to the point where you actually can ask for help without having your entire crew disowning you.

I would encourage every new recruit as I have always taught them on OJT to always ask for help when they cant seem to shake that anxious emptiness that is with them when they go to bed and rolls over with them when they wake up.

The resources available outside the institution have increased 10 fold since I started and doctors are taking it very seriously. Its so much easier to feel better if you hit those symptoms early instead of waiting for the day after you look at yourself in the bathroom mirror wondering why you cant leave the house except to get groceries at the only 24 hour Safeway in a 200km radius, and wanting to throw up at the thought of going in for another shift of death and despair.

Ive never been one to sugar coat anything. This job is not like most people think. Some officers go through their entire career and dont see much of anything. Others seem to be the great atrocity magnet. I can speak to everything I have written here and just want to make sure people have a full idea from someone inside the walls that the potential is there.

Complacency is the most dangerous word in the CSC. If you allow yourself and your team to be complacent, thats when the changes that have happened become truly dangerous. Your Union is fighting hard for you, but at the end of the day you decide where you put your hands and you decide what to say or not say.

Hope this helps.

K.

And BTW the hiring process is way easier than the CBSA so if you made it through that this one is a lot less intense.
Thank you for the great response. These answers are a great help. This is a career I can see myself doing but I guess my main struggles with it right now are personal. I have a hard time with the thought of bringing something home that affects my kids or wife, or having something happen that affects my ability to earn a living for them. I’ve always wanted a career in law enforcement and I almost achieved it, minus a bad luck incident in training. I guess for now I’m going to keep researching and thinking about whether this is for me or not. Again, thanks for the comments and hopefully more will chime in. I think it’s great to have a good dialogue on conversations like these. This forum is a fantastic tool. I appreciate everyone on it.

Amazing post Kev. Also I would highly suggest watching what Hockeyguy already said. Blood in the cells.
During troop, you could see a lot of faces drop. Excellent video to showcase what you're getting yourself into.
I have a troop mate in RPC, within a week, he got pee bombed because he wouldn't allow an inmate to make an unscheduled call. He's still there and he loves it a lot.
Same with my friends in Kent, OJT mandatory OT, just pulled 16 hours yesterday. They still like it.
I didn't make it out of CTP, but I think about it a lot. I would probably re-apply after Christmas time.

A good thing about CSC is that if you wanted to move to RCMP, CBSA, DFO.. Because you're already a federal employee, the pension moves with you.
During a Search and Rescue mission, I was speaking to an RCMP officer and he was telling me he used to be CBSA then went to RCMP and everything followed, still had to do 6 months in Depot.
CSC is an excellent way to start your career. I also want to make note, my time from application to Kingston, January 15 - June 6th 2019. I was rushed into CTP 3. It really sucks that I didn't make it though and if I could turn back time on that C8, I would make sure I pass :(


*edit*
It's actually called Bloody Cells on youtube.
Royal Canadian Marine Search & Rescue
SAR Member

JACX
Rookie Member
Posts: 49
Joined: Sun Oct 06, 2019 11:07 pm
Contact:

Re: Applying to Correctional Service Canada

Postby JACX » Sun Nov 10, 2019 7:40 pm

Hi,

Has anyone currently received an invitation to CTP 2/3, and had to decline and then had a subsequent invitation?
JACX

Applied: Jan. 2019
Testing: completed previously.
Interview: July 2019
References: Aug. 2019
Fingerprinting, med:Sept 2019
CTP1: Sept 2019-Oct. 2019
Psych + interview: Oct 2019
Audiogram:Completed
CTP2:TBD
CTP3:TBD

Jaxycash
Rookie Member
Posts: 5
Joined: Sat Oct 12, 2019 7:47 pm
Contact:

Re: Applying to Correctional Service Canada

Postby Jaxycash » Mon Nov 11, 2019 2:56 am

JACX wrote:
Sun Nov 10, 2019 7:40 pm
Hi,

Has anyone currently received an invitation to CTP 2/3, and had to decline and then had a subsequent invitation?
I just finished ctp1 today. do u get an email confirming that you are done?


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Google [Bot], SemrushBot, Steelcity94 and 2 guests