EPS service pistol

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godinluc
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EPS service pistol

Postby godinluc » Wed Oct 12, 2016 4:28 am

Can anyone tell me what the Edmonton Police uses as it's service pistol? I've recently put in my application, and although I have my RPAL, I still haven't purchased a handgun. So I figured I might as well try the EPS one! I'm optimistic about getting hired, so I may just buy one. It would allow me to familiarize myself with it anyhow!

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Jframer7
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Re: EPS service pistol

Postby Jframer7 » Wed Oct 12, 2016 4:35 am

godinluc wrote:Can anyone tell me what the Edmonton Police uses as it's service pistol? I've recently put in my application, and although I have my RPAL, I still haven't purchased a handgun. So I figured I might as well try the EPS one! I'm optimistic about getting hired, so I may just buy one. It would allow me to familiarize myself with it anyhow!
I would not get one, but it's a glock 22. At least I wouldn't get one before training class. You will probably pick up bad habits they will need to break you out of in class. Be easier to train a clear slate...but that's just my opinion on it. And yes I had handguns prior to being hired. Yes I had to relearn to do it the "eps" way. And frankly a better way then I picked up shooting on my own.

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Dave Brown
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Re: EPS service pistol

Postby Dave Brown » Wed Oct 12, 2016 3:22 pm

I completely agree with this advice. Save the pistol purchase until after you get on. You may even get on with another agency, but regardless, you will have to unlearn all the skills you picked up and then relearn all the correct skills.

There is a huge difference between target shooting, and having your target shoot back at you.

godinluc
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Re: EPS service pistol

Postby godinluc » Sat Oct 15, 2016 11:28 am

Well, the Glock 22 is a great pistol any way you look at it, though I might go with an extended mag release if I can. I don't think I'd regret that purchase! I was also going to get a training session from a local former RCMP officer who offered. Didn't think it could be that much different from the EPS methodology. Thoughts?

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Jframer7
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Re: EPS service pistol

Postby Jframer7 » Sat Oct 15, 2016 9:08 pm

godinluc wrote:Well, the Glock 22 is a great pistol any way you look at it, though I might go with an extended mag release if I can. I don't think I'd regret that purchase! I was also going to get a training session from a local former RCMP officer who offered. Didn't think it could be that much different from the EPS methodology. Thoughts?
I already posted my thoughts, if you want to go against that and do your own thing, your a grown up I presume and that's your call.

If you want to get a gun and get some firearms instruction because you think it will give you a leg up in training, I would not bother. Wait till class, get trained the eps way. After training if you want to buy a glock 22 and continue to seek additional training I think that would be a good thing.

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Dave Brown
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Re: EPS service pistol

Postby Dave Brown » Sun Oct 16, 2016 7:08 am

Well the fact that you are already looking at adding useless accessories to your pistol is an indication that you may have already made up your mind. We are trying to tell you that are going to learn skills that will need unlearning later. But it's your choice.

There are several very good reasons why police officers would never use an extended mag release. (No, I am not going to get into them on a public forum.)

You have now been given excellent advice from several people with a lot of experience. But it sounds like you have made up your mind already, and were just looking for confirmation.

Well, we are not Hancock. We are not here to tell people, "Good job." We told you that you that we thought you were making a mistake. Other serving officers in these forums will tell you the same thing.

Shooting for recreation, sport, physical and mental challenge and competition is a great activity. Save it for AFTER you get hired and trained. Then use the skills you are trained in, and practice those.

For anything that is required as an automatic reaction in a life-threatening situation - where you are coping with loss of hearing, tunnel vision and loss of fine motor skills - needs hundreds if not thousands of repetitions. You need to practice the RIGHT repetitions. Practice never made perfect. Only PERFECT practice makes perfect.

And, no, a former RCMP officer will not train the same way that EPS does. A former RCMP officer will not even train the way the RCMP does (today.)

You are making a mistake. It will do nothing for your résume and may even impact it negatively. But you are a grownup, as my friend above has said.

Lots of applicants join agencies with lots of previous firearms experience. This is what the smart ones do when they hit police college:
#1 - Sit down.
#2 - Shut up.
#3 - Do what your instructors tell you.
#4 - Repeat as necessary.

Good luck in the future. Let us know how you are making out. That's what this forum is for. (And don't forget to come back in here after your training, and say, "Yeah, you folks were right.")

Take care and stay safe.

godinluc
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Re: EPS service pistol

Postby godinluc » Sun Oct 16, 2016 7:26 pm

Jframer7 wrote:
godinluc wrote:Well, the Glock 22 is a great pistol any way you look at it, though I might go with an extended mag release if I can. I don't think I'd regret that purchase! I was also going to get a training session from a local former RCMP officer who offered. Didn't think it could be that much different from the EPS methodology. Thoughts?
I already posted my thoughts, if you want to go against that and do your own thing, your a grown up I presume and that's your call.

If you want to get a gun and get some firearms instruction because you think it will give you a leg up in training, I would not bother. Wait till class, get trained the eps way. After training if you want to buy a glock 22 and continue to seek additional training I think that would be a good thing.
Thanks for the input, Jframer! I appreciate it. Seems to be the concensus that I should hold off, so that's likely what I'll do. I'd I happen to find a good deal for a glock 22 I might buy it, but I won't do more than a function test on it to ensure it works so I don't start any bad habits!

godinluc
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Re: EPS service pistol

Postby godinluc » Sun Oct 16, 2016 7:42 pm

Dave Brown wrote:Well the fact that you are already looking at adding useless accessories to your pistol is an indication that you may have already made up your mind. We are trying to tell you that are going to learn skills that will need unlearning later. But it's your choice.

There are several very good reasons why police officers would never use an extended mag release. (No, I am not going to get into them on a public forum.)

You have now been given excellent advice from several people with a lot of experience. But it sounds like you have made up your mind already, and were just looking for confirmation.

Well, we are not Hancock. We are not here to tell people, "Good job." We told you that you that we thought you were making a mistake. Other serving officers in these forums will tell you the same thing.

Shooting for recreation, sport, physical and mental challenge and competition is a great activity. Save it for AFTER you get hired and trained. Then use the skills you are trained in, and practice those.

For anything that is required as an automatic reaction in a life-threatening situation - where you are coping with loss of hearing, tunnel vision and loss of fine motor skills - needs hundreds if not thousands of repetitions. You need to practice the RIGHT repetitions. Practice never made perfect. Only PERFECT practice makes perfect.

And, no, a former RCMP officer will not train the same way that EPS does. A former RCMP officer will not even train the way the RCMP does (today.)

You are making a mistake. It will do nothing for your résume and may even impact it negatively. But you are a grownup, as my friend above has said.

Lots of applicants join agencies with lots of previous firearms experience. This is what the smart ones do when they hit police college:
#1 - Sit down.
#2 - Shut up.
#3 - Do what your instructors tell you.
#4 - Repeat as necessary.

Good luck in the future. Let us know how you are making out. That's what this forum is for. (And don't forget to come back in here after your training, and say, "Yeah, you folks were right.")

Take care and stay safe.
Thanks for your thoughts, Dave. No, I hadn't made up my mind on what to do in this regard. I certainly would have LIKED to have been able to start some form of training early, but it seems to be the concensus that it's just not a good idea! I didn't think either eagerness to train nor a request for confirmation and clarification would count as black marks against me. I'll just have to be patient and wait for class, if i am able to get in. As I mentioned to Jframer7, although I may purchase one sooner if I am able to find a good deal, I'll neither practice nor train with it to ensure I don't start any bad habits! I prefer to learn before making the mistake so I'll jump ahead a bit and say it now, "Yeah, you folks were right!" ;) You take care as well!

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Dave Brown
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Re: EPS service pistol

Postby Dave Brown » Mon Oct 17, 2016 5:00 am

Good idea.

Taking training is not a black mark. Training is good. Well-delivered CFSC and CRFSC courses always looks good on a resumé. This helps develop the necessary muzzle control and trigger finger discipline, as well as ensure you don't say something stupid on day one of your firearms training, such as, "Gee Sarge, how many bullets can I load in my clip?"

But other courses may not be so good. I once had a student who had taken this stupid CAR shooting method course (that has now been completely discredited) and thought he could teach the course. I have also had a few firearms students who actually thought they knew more than the instructor. (Not going to happen. I wrote the book.)

It's not the training that's the issue; it's the attitude. If you are prepared to show up, be a sponge and do what they say, you are going to have an easy time.

By the way, if you want to get into target shooting with your own personal handgun, the model 17 is virtually the same as a model 22. Ammunition is cheaper; recoil is slightly less and 9mm isn't as hard on the guns as the .40. There is a reason why many agencies in North America are now considering going back to the 9mm. Anything you learn on the model 22 can be practiced with a model 17.

With today's ammunition, there are no advantages to the .40 calibre over the 9mm.

Raydeon
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Re: EPS service pistol

Postby Raydeon » Wed Jan 11, 2017 1:40 am

Jframer7 wrote:
godinluc wrote:Can anyone tell me what the Edmonton Police uses as it's service pistol? I've recently put in my application, and although I have my RPAL, I still haven't purchased a handgun. So I figured I might as well try the EPS one! I'm optimistic about getting hired, so I may just buy one. It would allow me to familiarize myself with the peblueprint.com bathmate review it anyhow!
I would not get one, but it's a glock 22. At least I wouldn't get one before training class. You will probably pick up bad habits they will need to break you out of in class. Be easier to train a clear slate...but that's just my opinion on it. And yes I had handguns prior to being hired. Yes I had to relearn to do it the "eps" way. And frankly a better way then I picked up shooting on my own.
Thanks for the advice, this makes sense now I think of it. I'll just wait and do the training properly.


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