Law Enforcement Jurisdictional/Detachment Disparities

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solidsnake
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Law Enforcement Jurisdictional/Detachment Disparities

Postby solidsnake » Thu Mar 26, 2020 5:12 pm

Hi, my question particularly pertains to the Lower Mainland and more specifically Surrey. I suppose there must be some Surrey RCMP Detachment officers or other neighbouring detachment officers here. What is the environment, call variety, FTO, clientele, policing like in Surrey in comparison to other detachments, in the country such as Lethbridge, Strathcona county, Red Deer, Moncton, Thompson, North Battleford? What similarities or differences/uniqueness could an officer expect starting their 6 month field training here in the LMD? Why do officers I speak with say no one wants to get Surrey? And why do I hear that Corporals at Depot advise that you shouldn’t want it? Thanks if anyone has some insight about policing starting off in Surrey or the LMD/ personal experience from when you got started :)

Also even if you’ve not formerly or currently policed the LMD, what was field training like, what kinds of things were thrown at you, and what did you do? I know it may be a bit broad but any stories or advice I would love to hear. Thanks again.

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Re: Law Enforcement Jurisdictional/Detachment Disparities

Postby VanSmack » Thu Mar 26, 2020 6:32 pm

While I can’t speak to the work specifically in Surrey or the LMD, I can speak to a number of the points raised in your post.

First, I have not seen any sort of widespread trend of any facilitators at Depot telling cadets that they shouldn’t want to go to Surrey, or anywhere else in the LMD. There are positives and negatives to going to the type of detachment that most LMD postings consist of, but none of them are such that it is an especially desirable/undesirable posting for new hires.

Lethbridge has their own municipal police, so you’re not going to get any RCMP members who have worked both Lethbridge and elsewhere unless they have changed agencies.

Policing in the LMD will be different than policing in other parts of the country in much the same way that general community standards, needs and expectations will vary from region to region. If you work in a rural Saskatchewan detachment where there are a few thousand people scattered over a small town and miles of farmland your duties and the expectations placed on you will be much different than what they would be in a high-density urban environment would be. If you work in a place with no highways and only dirt roads traffic enforcement may not be nearly the priority it would be in a place with a major traffic artery running through it. If you go to a large municipal detachment there will likely be a large support staff of civilians who will do a lot of the administrative tasks associated to your job, whereas if you go to a two-member fly-in detachment there will likely be no support staff and you will have to learn all of the minutiae of putting a file together and the operation of a detachment. From experience as well as seeing other member’s experiences, it’s usually easier to go from a small detachment to a larger one than the other way around. In the smaller spots you’ll generally be expected to fill your time with proactive work or actively investigating any and all complaints regardless of seriousness - as that is what the community will expect and you’ll have the time resources to do it. In the larger detachments there will be a lot more call volume and you’ll need to learn how to triage your call load in order to give priority to the investigations that are most serious and have a likelihood of resulting in charges being brought forward.

Field training is field training, you ride with your trainer and watch him do the job, Then they will let you drive and work the radio, and slowly he/she will start handing the workload over to you while assisting you in figuring out how to put the pieces together. Some trainers are better than others at how they manage this, but for the most part it’s a watch and learn and then slowly take over the role as you work through your 6 months.
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solidsnake
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Re: Law Enforcement Jurisdictional/Detachment Disparities

Postby solidsnake » Fri Mar 27, 2020 12:48 am

VanSmack wrote:
Thu Mar 26, 2020 6:32 pm
While I can’t speak to the work specifically in Surrey or the LMD, I can speak to a number of the points raised in your post.

First, I have not seen any sort of widespread trend of any facilitators at Depot telling cadets that they shouldn’t want to go to Surrey, or anywhere else in the LMD. There are positives and negatives to going to the type of detachment that most LMD postings consist of, but none of them are such that it is an especially desirable/undesirable posting for new hires.

Lethbridge has their own municipal police, so you’re not going to get any RCMP members who have worked both Lethbridge and elsewhere unless they have changed agencies.

Policing in the LMD will be different than policing in other parts of the country in much the same way that general community standards, needs and expectations will vary from region to region. If you work in a rural Saskatchewan detachment where there are a few thousand people scattered over a small town and miles of farmland your duties and the expectations placed on you will be much different than what they would be in a high-density urban environment would be. If you work in a place with no highways and only dirt roads traffic enforcement may not be nearly the priority it would be in a place with a major traffic artery running through it. If you go to a large municipal detachment there will likely be a large support staff of civilians who will do a lot of the administrative tasks associated to your job, whereas if you go to a two-member fly-in detachment there will likely be no support staff and you will have to learn all of the minutiae of putting a file together and the operation of a detachment. From experience as well as seeing other member’s experiences, it’s usually easier to go from a small detachment to a larger one than the other way around. In the smaller spots you’ll generally be expected to fill your time with proactive work or actively investigating any and all complaints regardless of seriousness - as that is what the community will expect and you’ll have the time resources to do it. In the larger detachments there will be a lot more call volume and you’ll need to learn how to triage your call load in order to give priority to the investigations that are most serious and have a likelihood of resulting in charges being brought forward.

Field training is field training, you ride with your trainer and watch him do the job, Then they will let you drive and work the radio, and slowly he/she will start handing the workload over to you while assisting you in figuring out how to put the pieces together. Some trainers are better than others at how they manage this, but for the most part it’s a watch and learn and then slowly take over the role as you work through your 6 months.
Thank you for the insight and information, I appreciate the response greatly. I understand there’s differences in these detachments and have heard of many RCMP members going municipal in the LMD after a few years out in rural Alberta and Saskatchewan (I value having the prestigious Red Surge and Mountie designation a bit more than to want to make the switch haha, no disrespect to municipal officers though) and I thought Lethbridge had RCMP because they have a detachment website and physical locations listed in Lethbridge but have the municipal force there as well now that I see. Well anyways, thanks.

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Re: Law Enforcement Jurisdictional/Detachment Disparities

Postby AHP309 » Fri Mar 27, 2020 1:04 pm

The Lethbridge rural area is covered by Coaldale detachment. The Lethbridge detachment support sections (K9, Ident, Traffic) will move into the new detachment building currently under construction at the East side of Coaldale


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