Fire to police

Discuss the educational and physical requirements, testing process and background phase involved in the hiring process. Includes the experiences and advice of current and past applicants. All agency application related questions belong here.
Rob4613
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Re: Fire to police

Postby Rob4613 » Fri Nov 09, 2018 6:10 pm

I work with one. And he's headed back to fire soon lol


Did he give you an idea as to why?

Slovak4188
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Re: Fire to police

Postby Slovak4188 » Fri Nov 09, 2018 7:09 pm

Rob4613 wrote:
I work with one. And he's headed back to fire soon lol


Did he give you an idea as to why?

Several. You miss WAY more in terms of your family/personal life (we constantly have to do courses, paid duties, volunteering, etc). You make the same as Fire, but have to work 4 times harder while people call you racist, sexist and have media portray you as the bad guy. People will spit on you for no reason (metaphorically and literally, happened to me). I'd say in a given year, half of your shifts will end up in overtime (you're also expected to be there early to catch up on work which is NOT paid for). The burden of responsibility, let's face it, is far greater than Fire. When you work in some Bureaus, you are on call (which in recent times they have managed to fix a little, but still, coming in on a day off isn't ideal). etc etc

I disagree with most of what he thinks regarding the job, I personally really enjoy it and worked just as hard in my past lines of work for far less money. I find a lot of people DO appreciate the job we do; to this day I've only had 1 negative experience when arresting someone. ONE out of several hundred at this point.

It is what you make of it, but I find there's a reason firefighters don't make it here. It takes 2 vastly different personality types to be a firefighter and an officer.

Just food for thought. Particularly because if your attitude with your job is what you posted, don't expect anything different after you've been an officer for some time. You're either the public servant who sees the cup as half full or you're not. I personally am and I don't take things to heart (such as working 6 months on a domestic case to have the whole thing thrown out because the victim has a change of heart on court day and decides not to come). We do help the public. We do the job no one else wants to do. I love it. I wouldn't have it any other way, but there are certain realities you must face and not everyone has the power to face them gracefully.

If I were in your shoes, I'd REALLY think about that decision to move into this line of work long and hard.

Don't take this as me discouraging you; however, don't decide to do it and then quit because it wasn't what you expected, thus, taking someone else's spot in the process who would've enjoyed it.

I've been blessed with any excellent service as well as amazing bosses who are there to pull you up rather than use you and your mistakes for their next bump up the ladder.
"Hard truths cut both ways"

Rob4613
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Re: Fire to police

Postby Rob4613 » Fri Nov 09, 2018 9:19 pm

Slovak4188 wrote:
Rob4613 wrote:
I work with one. And he's headed back to fire soon lol


Did he give you an idea as to why?

Several. You miss WAY more in terms of your family/personal life (we constantly have to do courses, paid duties, volunteering, etc). You make the same as Fire, but have to work 4 times harder while people call you racist, sexist and have media portray you as the bad guy. People will spit on you for no reason (metaphorically and literally, happened to me). I'd say in a given year, half of your shifts will end up in overtime (you're also expected to be there early to catch up on work which is NOT paid for). The burden of responsibility, let's face it, is far greater than Fire. When you work in some Bureaus, you are on call (which in recent times they have managed to fix a little, but still, coming in on a day off isn't ideal). etc etc

I disagree with most of what he thinks regarding the job, I personally really enjoy it and worked just as hard in my past lines of work for far less money. I find a lot of people DO appreciate the job we do; to this day I've only had 1 negative experience when arresting someone. ONE out of several hundred at this point.

It is what you make of it, but I find there's a reason firefighters don't make it here. It takes 2 vastly different personality types to be a firefighter and an officer.

Just food for thought. Particularly because if your attitude with your job is what you posted, don't expect anything different after you've been an officer for some time. You're either the public servant who sees the cup as half full or you're not. I personally am and I don't take things to heart (such as working 6 months on a domestic case to have the whole thing thrown out because the victim has a change of heart on court day and decides not to come). We do help the public. We do the job no one else wants to do. I love it. I wouldn't have it any other way, but there are certain realities you must face and not everyone has the power to face them gracefully.

If I were in your shoes, I'd REALLY think about that decision to move into this line of work long and hard.

Don't take this as me discouraging you; however, don't decide to do it and then quit because it wasn't what you expected, thus, taking someone else's spot in the process who would've enjoyed it.

I've been blessed with any excellent service as well as amazing bosses who are there to pull you up rather than use you and your mistakes for their next bump up the ladder.



Amazing post. Thank you so much for the honesty. I have put a lot of thought into this, many sleepless nights (not at the hall, those are slept through soundly ;) ) and a lot of sacrifice to make this happen. What you said about firefighters and police officers having two vastly different personality types really resonates with me. People often ask me, why would you leave a job that you get paid good money, to watch tv, bbq etc, to go to a job for the same pay, but everyone hates you, you work much harder, and see your family less. Id love to answer this question from my perspective... so here goes... I worked my butt off to get into the position I currently hold, as a firefighter. I was told that only those who were willing to put in the work, head down, and focus would get a position. I did just that. I studied harder than I had before, getting top marks in school, before then focusing on my applications. I was young when I graduated, but that didn't put me down. I used my youthfulness as a positive. I applied all across the country, to 33 fulltime and composite departments, everywhere from the far west coast of BC, to the far east coast, and everything in between. I was rejected countless times because of one reason or another, never really disclosed to me. I was so sure that this job was what I wanted to do, and from the outside looking it, it was the holy grail of employment. Everyone loves you, you save peoples lives, and when people really need you the most, you are there for them. Once I finally obtained employment, I was over the moon. I was one of 39 recruits in my class, of a pool of more than 8000 applicants for that class. I had made it. I had finally achieved my dream. I got into the recruit class and started my training. Fast forward to now, realizing that there seems to be this sort of veil over everyone's head about what we realistically do as firefighters. I know that the movies aren't the same as real life, believe me, as a fellow first responder, with countless shows out there about my job, I know just how fake it can be. I knew this when first thinking about making the switch... so what did I do? I tried to get as many real answers as I could. I spoke with officers from 1 year on, to 36 years on and retiring. I went on ride alongs with difference services, just to see how things differed. Funny thing, my very first call on my first ride along, I had a water bottle of god knows what thrown on me from some amount of stories up, off a balcony and you know what, that still didnt turn me off to the idea of policing.

I have realized that my personality type does infact line up more with the policing side of things than fire. I cant just sit by while the world pats me on the back for the calls we all too infrequently attend, that actually are of substance.

I want so much more from my career than a nice place on the couch, and a not-so-cozy bed to lay down in while working. I want to be proactive with my career choice. I want to make things happen if they arent already happening. I want to work my butt off, push myself and test my boundaries. I want to write the test, do the physical, take the courses, study the books, and make that unit, team, division or promotion. I am sick of the idea that for me to advance in my current career, its simply a waiting game... a waiting game of 25+ years for my first promotion, and even then, its solely based on sceniority.

I want to be proactive, and not reactive. If it means that I switch into a job that people more often than not, DONT want to see me, or that I cant infact watch the big game on TV because I'm working, well thats tough.

I already work all the holidays for my fellow members, because I know how much christmas means to that small child, and waking up early to open gifts with the family means everything to a little one. I volunteer my time to take others shifts, so that they can be with the ones they love.

I'm used to sacrafice, and if it means I have to take a pay cut for the next few years because I go back down to a noobie, so be it. I will fall in line, I've learned the importance of keeping your head up, your ears open, and your mouth shut, and I'm willing to do it all over again for a career that I can be proud of, and look back when I'm old and my hair is grey, and know that I made a differece, in some way, shape or form, because I took those steps to do so.



SORRY FOR THE LONG WALL OF TEXT, lol.

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Re: Fire to police

Postby Slovak4188 » Fri Nov 09, 2018 11:43 pm

Several. You miss WAY more in terms of your family/personal life (we constantly have to do courses, paid duties, volunteering, etc). You make the same as Fire, but have to work 4 times harder while people call you racist, sexist and have media portray you as the bad guy. People will spit on you for no reason (metaphorically and literally, happened to me). I'd say in a given year, half of your shifts will end up in overtime (you're also expected to be there early to catch up on work which is NOT paid for). The burden of responsibility, let's face it, is far greater than Fire. When you work in some Bureaus, you are on call (which in recent times they have managed to fix a little, but still, coming in on a day off isn't ideal). etc etc

I disagree with most of what he thinks regarding the job, I personally really enjoy it and worked just as hard in my past lines of work for far less money. I find a lot of people DO appreciate the job we do; to this day I've only had 1 negative experience when arresting someone. ONE out of several hundred at this point.

It is what you make of it, but I find there's a reason firefighters don't make it here. It takes 2 vastly different personality types to be a firefighter and an officer.

Just food for thought. Particularly because if your attitude with your job is what you posted, don't expect anything different after you've been an officer for some time. You're either the public servant who sees the cup as half full or you're not. I personally am and I don't take things to heart (such as working 6 months on a domestic case to have the whole thing thrown out because the victim has a change of heart on court day and decides not to come). We do help the public. We do the job no one else wants to do. I love it. I wouldn't have it any other way, but there are certain realities you must face and not everyone has the power to face them gracefully.

If I were in your shoes, I'd REALLY think about that decision to move into this line of work long and hard.

Don't take this as me discouraging you; however, don't decide to do it and then quit because it wasn't what you expected, thus, taking someone else's spot in the process who would've enjoyed it.

I've been blessed with any excellent service as well as amazing bosses who are there to pull you up rather than use you and your mistakes for their next bump up the ladder.[/quote]


Amazing post. Thank you so much for the honesty. I have put a lot of thought into this, many sleepless nights (not at the hall, those are slept through soundly ;) ) and a lot of sacrifice to make this happen. What you said about firefighters and police officers having two vastly different personality types really resonates with me. People often ask me, why would you leave a job that you get paid good money, to watch tv, bbq etc, to go to a job for the same pay, but everyone hates you, you work much harder, and see your family less. Id love to answer this question from my perspective... so here goes... I worked my butt off to get into the position I currently hold, as a firefighter. I was told that only those who were willing to put in the work, head down, and focus would get a position. I did just that. I studied harder than I had before, getting top marks in school, before then focusing on my applications. I was young when I graduated, but that didn't put me down. I used my youthfulness as a positive. I applied all across the country, to 33 fulltime and composite departments, everywhere from the far west coast of BC, to the far east coast, and everything in between. I was rejected countless times because of one reason or another, never really disclosed to me. I was so sure that this job was what I wanted to do, and from the outside looking it, it was the holy grail of employment. Everyone loves you, you save peoples lives, and when people really need you the most, you are there for them. Once I finally obtained employment, I was over the moon. I was one of 39 recruits in my class, of a pool of more than 8000 applicants for that class. I had made it. I had finally achieved my dream. I got into the recruit class and started my training. Fast forward to now, realizing that there seems to be this sort of veil over everyone's head about what we realistically do as firefighters. I know that the movies aren't the same as real life, believe me, as a fellow first responder, with countless shows out there about my job, I know just how fake it can be. I knew this when first thinking about making the switch... so what did I do? I tried to get as many real answers as I could. I spoke with officers from 1 year on, to 36 years on and retiring. I went on ride alongs with difference services, just to see how things differed. Funny thing, my very first call on my first ride along, I had a water bottle of god knows what thrown on me from some amount of stories up, off a balcony and you know what, that still didnt turn me off to the idea of policing.

I have realized that my personality type does infact line up more with the policing side of things than fire. I cant just sit by while the world pats me on the back for the calls we all too infrequently attend, that actually are of substance.

I want so much more from my career than a nice place on the couch, and a not-so-cozy bed to lay down in while working. I want to be proactive with my career choice. I want to make things happen if they arent already happening. I want to work my butt off, push myself and test my boundaries. I want to write the test, do the physical, take the courses, study the books, and make that unit, team, division or promotion. I am sick of the idea that for me to advance in my current career, its simply a waiting game... a waiting game of 25+ years for my first promotion, and even then, its solely based on sceniority.

I want to be proactive, and not reactive. If it means that I switch into a job that people more often than not, DONT want to see me, or that I cant infact watch the big game on TV because I'm working, well thats tough.

I already work all the holidays for my fellow members, because I know how much christmas means to that small child, and waking up early to open gifts with the family means everything to a little one. I volunteer my time to take others shifts, so that they can be with the ones they love.

I'm used to sacrafice, and if it means I have to take a pay cut for the next few years because I go back down to a noobie, so be it. I will fall in line, I've learned the importance of keeping your head up, your ears open, and your mouth shut, and I'm willing to do it all over again for a career that I can be proud of, and look back when I'm old and my hair is grey, and know that I made a differece, in some way, shape or form, because I took those steps to do so.



SORRY FOR THE LONG WALL OF TEXT, lol.[/quote]

All the power to you brother. Just remember, when you take a spot on that hiring list, earn it. From the day hired to the day you retire. 1000's of applications every year. Most never get in (more so with fire i'd imagine). Be an officer of your word, be honourable and expect nothing but the best of yourself each shift.
"Hard truths cut both ways"

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Re: Fire to police

Postby MasterPlanMan » Sat Nov 10, 2018 1:11 pm

Slovak4188 wrote:
Rob4613 wrote:
I work with one. And he's headed back to fire soon lol


Did he give you an idea as to why?

Several. You miss WAY more in terms of your family/personal life (we constantly have to do courses, paid duties, volunteering, etc). You make the same as Fire, but have to work 4 times harder while people call you racist, sexist and have media portray you as the bad guy. People will spit on you for no reason (metaphorically and literally, happened to me). I'd say in a given year, half of your shifts will end up in overtime (you're also expected to be there early to catch up on work which is NOT paid for).


I can't speak for everyone, but that sucks and is unheard of here. Even a new recruit out of training, who is under stress, overworked and has lots expected of them, never NEVER works for free. Whether its time balance or overtime. That should not be a thing.

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Re: Fire to police

Postby Rob4613 » Sat Nov 10, 2018 1:29 pm

All the power to you brother. Just remember, when you take a spot on that hiring list, earn it. From the day hired to the day you retire. 1000's of applications every year. Most never get in (more so with fire i'd imagine). Be an officer of your word, be honourable and expect nothing but the best of yourself each shift


Thank you sir! I will do my very best, to both earn, and hold the position that I am working towards.

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Re: Fire to police

Postby Comm123 » Sat Nov 10, 2018 9:33 pm

Slovak4188 wrote:Several. You miss WAY more in terms of your family/personal life (we constantly have to do courses, paid duties, volunteering, etc)
.

Paid Duties are voluntarily, you don't have to constantly do them. I do the occasionally one, but as far as constantly doing them it's totally up to you.

Slovak4188 wrote:. I'd say in a given year, half of your shifts will end up in overtime (you're also expected to be there early to catch up on work which is NOT paid for).


That's a cultural thing, I was with your service and that is the norm for THAT service; not everyone else. A lot of services frown upon doing work for free and give you time during working hours for you to catch up on stuff.

Rob4613 wrote:

I'm used to sacrafice, and if it means I have to take a pay cut for the next few years because I go back down to a noobie, so be it. I will fall in line, I've learned the importance of keeping your head up, your ears open, and your mouth shut, and I'm willing to do it all over again for a career that I can be proud of, and look back when I'm old and my hair is grey, and know that I made a differece, in some way, shape or form, because I took those steps to do so.




As for the original question, I had written this long response on my phone and then technology decided to erase it.

I know a guy who got on a few months before I did; switched to fire about a year and a half in. I run into him at a call, didn't know he was a firefighter working in the same city I work in. Says he loves Fire and never regrets making the switch, says he goes home without stress and without anxiety.

Bottom line is there are pros and cons for both jobs; at the end of the day do what is right for you and decide what you want to do with your career; by the sounds of it, you have already made up your mind.

At the end of the day, as I've been told my countless people; don't make this job define who you are. This job probably much like fire takes A LOT from you probably more, There were guys in my station who have gone home and hanged themselves because of this job, I've know guys who have had a complete mental break down due to this job, I've known guys who have suffered strokes, heart attacks because of the stress of the job, in a few weeks I'll be going to another funeral for another fallen brother. Yes I know it happens in Fire, EMS but lately I've seen more and more cops who are struggling.

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Re: Fire to police

Postby Slovak4188 » Sat Nov 10, 2018 10:47 pm

Comm123 wrote:
Slovak4188 wrote:Several. You miss WAY more in terms of your family/personal life (we constantly have to do courses, paid duties, volunteering, etc)
.

Paid Duties are voluntarily, you don't have to constantly do them. I do the occasionally one, but as far as constantly doing them it's totally up to you.

Slovak4188 wrote:. I'd say in a given year, half of your shifts will end up in overtime (you're also expected to be there early to catch up on work which is NOT paid for).


That's a cultural thing, I was with your service and that is the norm for THAT service; not everyone else. A lot of services frown upon doing work for free and give you time during working hours for you to catch up on stuff.

Rob4613 wrote:

I'm used to sacrafice, and if it means I have to take a pay cut for the next few years because I go back down to a noobie, so be it. I will fall in line, I've learned the importance of keeping your head up, your ears open, and your mouth shut, and I'm willing to do it all over again for a career that I can be proud of, and look back when I'm old and my hair is grey, and know that I made a differece, in some way, shape or form, because I took those steps to do so.




As for the original question, I had written this long response on my phone and then technology decided to erase it.

I know a guy who got on a few months before I did; switched to fire about a year and a half in. I run into him at a call, didn't know he was a firefighter working in the same city I work in. Says he loves Fire and never regrets making the switch, says he goes home without stress and without anxiety.

Bottom line is there are pros and cons for both jobs; at the end of the day do what is right for you and decide what you want to do with your career; by the sounds of it, you have already made up your mind.

At the end of the day, as I've been told my countless people; don't make this job define who you are. This job probably much like fire takes A LOT from you probably more, There were guys in my station who have gone home and hanged themselves because of this job, I've know guys who have had a complete mental break down due to this job, I've known guys who have suffered strokes, heart attacks because of the stress of the job, in a few weeks I'll be going to another funeral for another fallen brother. Yes I know it happens in Fire, EMS but lately I've seen more and more cops who are struggling.


Depends on the paid duty. Some you are voluntold.

Also i agree, that is probably only unique to certain services; however, it is what it is. I don't mind. Lots of jobs expect that. At least compensation is on the higher end for this career.
"Hard truths cut both ways"

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Re: Fire to police

Postby devilwoman » Mon Nov 12, 2018 8:57 am

Depends on the paid duty. Some you are voluntold.


Not quite sure how that works. Me thinks y'all have a shitty system.

I don't mind. Lots of jobs expect that


As for doing paperwork unpaid......ummmm no. It's not about hating the job or sticking it to management, but don't be okay with that. A big portion of the calls is the paperwork....would you respond to a call for free? Why is the paperwork any different? It's completely wrong they expect this and you guys allow it. Doesn't matter the compensation. They either pay you OT or they give you time on shift.
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Re: Fire to police

Postby SHAMROCK » Sat Nov 17, 2018 5:19 am

devilwoman wrote:
Depends on the paid duty. Some you are voluntold.
Not quite sure how that works. Me thinks y'all have a shitty system.
I don't mind. Lots of jobs expect that
As for doing paperwork unpaid......ummmm no. It's not about hating the job or sticking it to management, but don't be okay with that. A big portion of the calls is the paperwork....would you respond to a call for free? Why is the paperwork any different? It's completely wrong they expect this and you guys allow it. Doesn't matter the compensation. They either pay you OT or they give you time on shift.
I have a suspicion as to what service Slovak4188 works for....if I am correct this something that may have been "agreed" to between the Association and the Service...just taking an educated guess because I know people from that service and they have mentioned the same thing....off course I could be totally wrong...it does happen :drinking:

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Re: Fire to police

Postby otwobjj » Mon Nov 19, 2018 10:51 am

New officers are expected to clear from calls as fast as possible; especially if it's busy, so that they can clear senior officers off crappy calls or jump on calls in their respective zones.

That does not mean doing a domestic paper on your own time. But it does mean Coming in early for Admin stuff and doing Collision reports on your own time so that you are 10-8 during the shift..

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Re: Fire to police

Postby bunnel » Mon Nov 19, 2018 6:38 pm

otwobjj wrote:New officers are expected to clear from calls as fast as possible; especially if it's busy, so that they can clear senior officers off crappy calls or jump on calls in their respective zones.

That does not mean doing a domestic paper on your own time. But it does mean Coming in early for Admin stuff and doing Collision reports on your own time so that you are 10-8 during the shift..
Wow. Sounds crazy. :ponder:

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Re: Fire to police

Postby Slovak4188 » Mon Nov 19, 2018 7:06 pm

otwobjj wrote:New officers are expected to clear from calls as fast as possible; especially if it's busy, so that they can clear senior officers off crappy calls or jump on calls in their respective zones.

That does not mean doing a domestic paper on your own time. But it does mean Coming in early for Admin stuff and doing Collision reports on your own time so that you are 10-8 during the shift..
Exactly...and if you don't do this, you'll be the guy who has to get called into the Staff's or Sarge's office to explain why your task list is 4 pages long.
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Re: Fire to police

Postby Slovak4188 » Tue Nov 20, 2018 12:05 am

opp2 wrote:
Slovak4188 wrote:
otwobjj wrote:New officers are expected to clear from calls as fast as possible; especially if it's busy, so that they can clear senior officers off crappy calls or jump on calls in their respective zones.

That does not mean doing a domestic paper on your own time. But it does mean Coming in early for Admin stuff and doing Collision reports on your own time so that you are 10-8 during the shift..
Exactly...and if you don't do this, you'll be the guy who has to get called into the Staff's or Sarge's office to explain why your task list is 4 pages long.
What service is this??? I can guess but can tell you that my guys are not expected in early or to stay late on their own time. All the time the work is paid. But they are expected to manage their time accordingly. We have the benefit of being a farily low call volume office so there is time to get your stuff done on shift. And i'm happy to go out and take calls so that the team can take theirs...
Don't be mistaken, my bosses are great and I have no complaints regarding them. My staff sarge in particular looks out for us, period. When push comes to shove, if you are honest and work hard, he has your back and will do whatever he can in his power to help you out.

The reality is that we work at one of the busiest divisional detachments in all of Canada. As otwobjj said, you usually do have to come in early to do your tasks and follow ups, but I never saw that as an issue. There are few things you CAN control in this job and being punctual is one of them. The bosses know who comes in early, who is on top of their tasks, who is doing good work and they let us know on every occasion where its applicable without sounding insincere.
"Hard truths cut both ways"


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