Record Suspensions

Discuss the educational and physical requirements, testing process and background phase involved in the hiring process. Includes the experiences and advice of current and past applicants. All agency application related questions belong here.
mck214
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Record Suspensions

Postby mck214 » Sun Oct 23, 2016 6:25 pm

How much do law enforcement agencies take into account someones disclosed record suspension? I have noticed a few topics on the forums around people having license suspensions for impaired driving, charges for selling drugs, domestic issues etc. If someone were to be charged with something like this and eventually had it pardoned would a law enforcement agency still maintain it as a terrible reflection of someones character and hold it against them? or do they look at it as water under the bridge. Also, what if an applicant had something as serious as an assault charge at one point and had a record suspension/pardon for it?

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Re: Record Suspensions

Postby Dave Brown » Sun Oct 23, 2016 8:46 pm

Just wondering why so many people think actions don't have consequences. "I can do anything I want. I will just get a pardon in a few years, and all will be fine!"

This is the attitude that makes recruiters CRINGE. Seriously. Some people think that the decisions they made as a young person won't affect them the rest of their life. Well, maybe you can pass on this truth - actions have consequences. A pardon does NOT mean their actions don't need to be disclosed. It CAN affect them the rest of their lives.

I honestly cannot believe that anyone with an impaired driving charge, a history of domestic violence, a background of selling drugs, a driving record with serious offences and licence suspensions on file would even THINK they could (or should) become police officers. THEY WILL NOT GET HIRED.

The people who come on to these forums with these sob stories where they only disclose a part of their sad record and conveniently forget the rest of it, and then complain they can't get hired ... never should have wasted their time applying. They seriously need to find a new career path.

Or, did they think that because police agencies are looking for good recruits that they were magically going to lower their standards? 88) 88) 88) 88) 88) 88)

So, in answer to your questions, yes they take it into account. They take EVERYTHING into account. Just picture what would happen if that police officer were to be hired, and then be on the witness stand one day for arresting a person for domestic violence, selling drugs or dangerous driving. How would they answer if a defence liar ever asked them, "Officer, have YOU ever been arrested for this same charge?" The charge would get thrown out of court. No police agency in Canada is going to take that chance. There are far too many good applicants who work hard toward their goal and have kept their transgressions minor for an agency to take a chance on someone with a serious record.

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Re: Record Suspensions

Postby mck214 » Sun Oct 23, 2016 9:21 pm

edit

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Re: Record Suspensions

Postby mck214 » Mon Oct 24, 2016 1:38 am

Dave Brown wrote:Just wondering why so many people think actions don't have consequences. "I can do anything I want. I will just get a pardon in a few years, and all will be fine!"

This is the attitude that makes recruiters CRINGE. Seriously. Some people think that the decisions they made as a young person won't affect them the rest of their life. Well, maybe you can pass on this truth - actions have consequences. A pardon does NOT mean their actions don't need to be disclosed. It CAN affect them the rest of their lives.

I honestly cannot believe that anyone with an impaired driving charge, a history of domestic violence, a background of selling drugs, a driving record with serious offences or any licence suspensions on file would even THINK they could (or should) become police officers. THEY WILL NOT GET HIRED.

The people who come on to these forums with these sob stories where they only disclose a part of their sad record and conveniently forget the rest of it, and then complain they can't get hired ... never should have wasted their time applying. They seriously need to find a new career path.

Or, did they think that because police agencies are looking for good recruits that they were magically going to lower their standards? 88) 88) 88) 88) 88) 88)

So, in answer to your questions, yes they take it into account. They take EVERYTHING into account. Just picture what would happen if that police officer were to be hired, and then be on the witness stand one day for arresting a person for domestic violence, selling drugs or dangerous driving. How would they answer if a defence liar ever asked them, "Officer, have YOU ever been arrested for this same charge?" The charge would get thrown out of court. No police agency in Canada is going to take that chance. There are far too many good applicants who work hard toward their goal and have kept their transgressions minor for an agency to take a chance on someone with a serious record.



So no one that has received a record suspension has ever gotten a job in law enforcement?

Also, what about law enforcement members that are arrested/charged while they are actively serving? are they automatically dismissed and black balled from every type of law enforcement position?

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Re: Record Suspensions

Postby Proteus » Mon Oct 24, 2016 4:36 am

You've been a member on these boards for a while now so it's a bit surprising to me that you couldn't foresee the types of replies a thread like this would get... but to answer your question, the minimum requirements to apply for police constable positions often include "No criminal conviction(s) for which a pardon has not been granted."

With whatever history you have I'm sure that it's making you nervous about the application process. Perhaps that uncertainty lead you to post here for a bit of reassurance.. but this isn't the place, we aren't the people who can offer that .... you need to apply, give the interviews your best shot, and hope that they've seen you've bettered yourself over the years and are now suitable for the position. If not, either give it a few more years, or be proud that you tried your best and find a new occupation.

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Re: Record Suspensions

Postby mck214 » Mon Oct 24, 2016 12:16 pm

Proteus wrote:You've been a member on these boards for a while now so it's a bit surprising to me that you couldn't foresee the types of replies a thread like this would get... but to answer your question, the minimum requirements to apply for police constable positions often include "No criminal conviction(s) for which a pardon has not been granted."

With whatever history you have I'm sure that it's making you nervous about the application process. Perhaps that uncertainty lead you to post here for a bit of reassurance.. but this isn't the place, we aren't the people who can offer that .... you need to apply, give the interviews your best shot, and hope that they've seen you've bettered yourself over the years and are now suitable for the position. If not, either give it a few more years, or be proud that you tried your best and find a new occupation.



I am not looking for any kind of re assurance. I had a couple minor run-ins when I was younger but that was a decade ago.

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Re: Record Suspensions

Postby Toonces » Mon Oct 24, 2016 2:43 pm

Minor run-ins shouldn't result in a record suspension or criminal convictions requiring a pardon. Downplaying these run-ins absolutely most certainly will hurt your application.

These will not at all be taken lightly, and nor should they.

I would think one must have improved by light years in order to even be considered for an interview. Recruitment is becoming more competitive every day. Police forces are reviewing many applications all the time from applicants who have not had any run-ins with the law, "minor" or not.
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Re: Record Suspensions

Postby mck214 » Mon Oct 24, 2016 3:44 pm

Toonces wrote:Minor run-ins shouldn't result in a record suspension or criminal convictions requiring a pardon. Downplaying these run-ins absolutely most certainly will hurt your application.

These will not at all be taken lightly, and nor should they.

I would think one must have improved by light years in order to even be considered for an interview. Recruitment is becoming more competitive every day. Police forces are reviewing many applications all the time from applicants who have not had any run-ins with the law, "minor" or not.


I made this thread because I have spoken to more than one person within the last few months that have had serious charges and still are in law enforcement. It completely contradicted the posts I have seen on these forums. Granted, they were likely hired years ago before the recruitment process was as strict. One person in particular had a full on assault charge that was never pardoned when they were hired and still do have it. They may possibly be full of sh*t as well.

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Re: Record Suspensions

Postby SullyBrown » Mon Oct 24, 2016 3:56 pm

mck214 wrote:
I made this thread because I have spoken to more than one person within the last few months that have had serious charges and still are in law enforcement. It completely contradicted the posts I have seen on these forums. Granted, they were likely hired years ago before the recruitment process was as strict. One person in particular had a full on assault charge that was never pardoned when they were hired and still do have it. They may possibly be full of sh*t as well.


Most of the people on this forum, including me, can only give you their opinion..which is completely useless to whether or not you will be successful in the application process of a law enforcement officer.

Just apply and stop caring about other people's opinions.

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Re: Record Suspensions

Postby alexgue89 » Mon Oct 24, 2016 3:59 pm

Dave Brown wrote:So, in answer to your questions, yes they take it into account. They take EVERYTHING into account. Just picture what would happen if that police officer were to be hired, and then be on the witness stand one day for arresting a person for domestic violence, selling drugs or dangerous driving. How would they answer if a defence liar ever asked them, "Officer, have YOU ever been arrested for this same charge?" The charge would get thrown out of court. No police agency in Canada is going to take that chance. There are far too many good applicants who work hard toward their goal and have kept their transgressions minor for an agency to take a chance on someone with a serious record.


I wouldn't necessarily say the case would be thrown out. As someone who has worked in a Criminal Law Firm, and has had the chance to cross-examine officers, if the crown has more evidence than just the testimony of the officer (which I would hope they do, since they have the onus of proof) there is still a chance at a conviction depending on the other evidence gathered and how it was obtain through a voir dire. Yes I agree that an officer with previous convictions makes for a potentially un-creditable witness but I will respectfully disagree with statement that it means the case would be thrown out.

P.S. "defence liar" I died laughing at this. :alright:
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Re: Record Suspensions

Postby Dave Brown » Tue Oct 25, 2016 6:04 am

Oops, I meant "lawyer." My bad.

My point was simple, and it seemed to have escaped both you and the OP. It had nothing to do with whether a charge would get thrown out of court or not. That was just one TINY example. The point is - why would a police agency take a chance on a questionable applicant with a serious charge on their record when there are lots of applicants with clean records and who never needed pardons or committed serious offences. It is a competitive process.

They might still get hired. They might not get hired. Only the recruiter can answer this question. Every applicant is decided on a case-by-case basis, and only the recruiter and the agency can decide, based on full disclosure of their past and present circumstances, whether an applicant would make a suitable candidate or not.

As we have now just seen, no one discloses the full story here in these forums anyway. NOBODY needs a pardon for a few "minor run-ins" with the law. Obviously, someone is not being honest with us.

I just hope they don't think they can lie to the recruiter too!

Rationalizing past behaviour by trying to tell WORKING POLICE OFFICERS and RECRUITERS who read this forum every day that so-and-so got on with a criminal record, and that their own pardons were for "minor run-ins" is already an indication of lack of ethics and a disturbing inability to take responsibility for their actions.

The correct way to approach this is, "Yeah, I did it; I learned from it, and I have moved on since. What are my chances?" not "Well how come police officers are charged with criminal offences and they still stay on?"

Does this person seriously believe that every complaint and vexatious charge against a working police officer should result in immediate firing before they have even been found guilty? :banghead: :banghead: :banghead: :banghead: :banghead:

Honestly, some days I think recruiters read these threads and just want to sit down and cry.

We actually had someone ask what they should wear to drop off their application on another thread. I cannot believe that people need to even ASK these questions.

They are going to walk into a place where they are about to have EVERY aspect of their past and present life scrutinized to the finest detail; they will be walking into a place where they could be bumping in to anyone from the Chief to the recruiter and their their potential future partners ... and they have to ASK this question? Has common sense completely escaped the facebook generation?

No, just wear your flip flops, stained sweatpants and your "4:20 4EVER!" t-shirt. You only need to wear good clothes at the actual interview. After all, who's going to see you just dropping off an application. If you can't get the stink of dope out of your sweatpants, just spray them with fabreeze. Even the drug-sniffing dogs can't smell through THAT shit! As the great philosopher Homer once said:
No one's thought of anything THAT clever before!

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Re: Record Suspensions

Postby mack_silent » Tue Oct 25, 2016 7:00 am

I've seen alot of "interesting" clothing choices by other applicants:(Could make a bingo game, as there's some to spot at every event!)
-The "Tough Guy": MMA tapout T-shirt, khaki cargo shorts, flip flop sandals, neck tattoo, and aviator sunglasses worn indoors.
-The "Vet": Full camoflauge fatigues and backpack. (I'd be surprised if recruiters saw him)
-The "Mom just woke me up for this": Sweat pants with words down the side, hooded sweatshirt (stained), toque, and full winter coat worn indoors.
-The "I didn't get the memo": Jeans and a T-shirt when the recruiting email said "Full business attire"
(recruiting staff "talked" to this last guy about not being able to follow simple instructions, as he was 1 of 25 people to not wear the full business attire AND he showed up late)

I was at a testing event for a municipal job (pay scale was 80-100K+) and less than 10% of applicants wore full business attire.
Another 20% wore business casual attire.
The rest were wearing "weekend wear" casual attire: track suits, jeans, T-shirts, running shoes, etc.
Respect the career you're applying for, show the recruiters you have the ability to look professional, and don't forget to polish your shoes!
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Re: Record Suspensions

Postby cco » Tue Oct 25, 2016 11:03 am

I was shocked how many people were wearing sweatpants or jeans to a written test I had taken! 'Just' a written test to me is still a test of how you present yourself. Professionalism should be shown at every stage!
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Re: Record Suspensions

Postby Toonces » Tue Oct 25, 2016 12:43 pm

mck214 wrote:
Toonces wrote:Minor run-ins shouldn't result in a record suspension or criminal convictions requiring a pardon. Downplaying these run-ins absolutely most certainly will hurt your application.

These will not at all be taken lightly, and nor should they.

I would think one must have improved by light years in order to even be considered for an interview. Recruitment is becoming more competitive every day. Police forces are reviewing many applications all the time from applicants who have not had any run-ins with the law, "minor" or not.


I made this thread because I have spoken to more than one person within the last few months that have had serious charges and still are in law enforcement. It completely contradicted the posts I have seen on these forums. Granted, they were likely hired years ago before the recruitment process was as strict. One person in particular had a full on assault charge that was never pardoned when they were hired and still do have it. They may possibly be full of sh*t as well.
Law enforcement or sworn police officers? Law enforcement is a tad ambiguous. For example: a by-law officer who has an assault conviction isn't nearly the same as a police officer with the same conviction.
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Re: Record Suspensions

Postby KJC33 » Tue Oct 25, 2016 2:20 pm

I’m super competitive, that is why I enjoy this police process oh so much!

From all the testing, interviews or seminars I have attended, I could not believe what some of these people were wearing. I was shocked! Even if I go in to have an informal meeting with a recruiter or know that there will be influential people at an event, I always dress to impress. It was stated already that you are scrutinized at every interaction when in the process with a police agency.

But in regards to the topic at hand, you hear stories about people who have been charged or convicted with some sort of "serious offence." But those are just stories, unless you hear them from the actual officer who went through the process and had to overcome those obstacles, take it as just a story. It has been mentioned before, your best bet it to contact recruiting and be completely honest with your situation. They will more than likely say, “We can’t say for sure, just apply and see what happens!” In my experiences unless you have a friend or family member you won’t get a definite yes or no. Unless you committed a "SERIOUS offence" and they will tell you to find a new career path.

I have been in the process for about 3 years now. I personally have had contact with police in my past, nothing "serious" in nature. I’m honest and open with my past and do not try to find a rational explanation for my negative actions. I always take full responsibility for my actions and the consequences of those actions. I admit to my mistakes, how I moved on from it, what I learned and how I've made myself better in various ways because of those experiences. My past discrepancies are always the first topic I tackle when I’m in an interview and I’ve been fortunate enough to have recruiters “chuckle” and ask me “what was I thinking”, then move on with the interview. I’ve even made it too a few panel interviews, but those past transgressions still come back to haunt me. It’s going to take more time to create time and distance and to develop more as an individual. But you just have to keep motivated and better yourself! You always have to remember how competitive this process is, you are competing with a massive applicant pool. People who have zero contact with police and who either have the same, if not more credentials then yourself.

Look at it like this, if you committed a “serious offence” were a pardon was needed and a police service hired you. Imagine what would happen if the media got a hold of that information, they would try and drag you and that service through the mud. We all see and hear how the media likes to put a stigma on policing and services wouldn’t want to take that chance.

All the information that has been given to you in this thread is all honest answers from individuals with a great deal of knowledge and experience. They have given you the best advice, don’t try to rationalize your actions!

This is just MY experience and opinion. But remember very applicant is viewed as case-by-case.


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