Ask A BC Sheriff

Discuss the educational and physical requirements, testing process and background phase involved in the hiring process. Includes the experiences and advice of current and past applicants. All agency application related questions belong here.
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Dorydory
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Re: Ask A BC Sheriff

Postby Dorydory » Sat Jun 13, 2020 10:21 pm

With covid19, I wouldn't be surprised to find a hiring freeze province wide in order to save money

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noanykey
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Re: Ask A BC Sheriff

Postby noanykey » Tue Jun 30, 2020 2:44 pm

Hi friends,

Those who completed the SRT, do they have a '3 strike' rule during classes? I had a friend fail a few times on the pistol and they gave him the boot.
A posting has come up for Feb and I think I might want to try it again, they'll also take a PARE time which I am currently training for.
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Sierra1993
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Re: Ask A BC Sheriff

Postby Sierra1993 » Tue Jun 30, 2020 6:40 pm

noanykey wrote:
Tue Jun 30, 2020 2:44 pm
Hi friends,

Those who completed the SRT, do they have a '3 strike' rule during classes? I had a friend fail a few times on the pistol and they gave him the boot.
A posting has come up for Feb and I think I might want to try it again, they'll also take a PARE time which I am currently training for.
You have to pass all of the tests to graduate. The Sheriff Academy is no joke, you have to meet the provincial standards (the same exact standards the other law enforcement agencies in the province have to meet)

In my opinion (comparing it to some other agencies that I have went through firearms training with, without mentioning names) Sheriffs is probably the best training I have ever received on pistol, exceeding the provincial standards - period. Amazing instructors all around that will invest in your success. If you take the safety aspect seriously and work extremely hard on the range, your chances of failing will be extremely low. I wouldn't even worry about how many times you are allowed to fail; just don't fail.

If you get there just work hard and you will be fine.

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noanykey
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Re: Ask A BC Sheriff

Postby noanykey » Tue Jun 30, 2020 10:58 pm

Thx for your reply. I’m not super worried about the pistol specifically.
It’s the academic stuff i have difficulties with. Every test i took in the academy, i was pretty much panicked. Buuutt it’s probably because i live in bc and was in Ontario.

I’m really looking forward to the training. Gotta get through that process which i failed a few years ago first.
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Re: Ask A BC Sheriff

Postby Highland2012 » Thu Jul 02, 2020 5:31 pm

In my SRT class, people who failed the firearms weren't issued their pistol and had to carry around a red gun in the meantime while the rest of us hand the real deal. The instructors will do everything they can to help you succeed.

If you failed a test, you would have to go in before class or after class and practice up in order to qualify. Most people who had difficulty only struggled with the official test. When it came to practice and regular range time they did absolutely fine. Text anxiety is a real thing.

As for failing firearms even after all the support and assistance; I think they could just throw you in a jail setting and keep you disarmed. I don't think they would punt you out of the course but mind you my SRT was a few years ago now.
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Re: Ask A BC Sheriff

Postby Sierra1993 » Fri Jul 03, 2020 1:16 pm

Highland2012 wrote:
Thu Jul 02, 2020 5:31 pm
In my SRT class, people who failed the firearms weren't issued their pistol and had to carry around a red gun in the meantime while the rest of us hand the real deal. The instructors will do everything they can to help you succeed.

If you failed a test, you would have to go in before class or after class and practice up in order to qualify. Most people who had difficulty only struggled with the official test. When it came to practice and regular range time they did absolutely fine. Text anxiety is a real thing.

As for failing firearms even after all the support and assistance; I think they could just throw you in a jail setting and keep you disarmed. I don't think they would punt you out of the course but mind you my SRT was a few years ago now.
Pretty much the same for my class (which was recent) nobody failed pistol. The only time I have heard of people failing is for blatant safety issues, or just absolutely dreadful shooting skills (like basically you would have to lack complete eye hand coordination) They had us shooting too much for anybody to fail, it was well over 2,000 rounds. They will punt you from the course though if you cannot qualify - happened to a few people in classes prior to me.

For the actual academic stuff - I was coming from Mission every day so basically I had no time after class to study (driving basically 3 hours a day on top of classes) I ended up audio recording myself going over the test reviews and just listened to them as I drove - only thing I could really do - seemed to work (really got tired of my own voice after awhile though)

They really don't want anybody to fail, I mean you get your badge the first day - even when I was in Corrections we didn't get that until graduation. Sheriffs seems to put a lot of confidence into their recruits - I really enjoyed the program - honestly the training is at an insane level. It's just unfortunate that on the job itself the duties seem to be more or less glorified security work with some corrections tacked into it.

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Re: Ask A BC Sheriff

Postby noanykey » Fri Jul 03, 2020 2:16 pm

Hey folks,

Thank you for the response. Sierra, I'm really happy to hear that you went from BCCO to Sheriffs.
In CSC, that 3 strike rule really messed with me. Being in Kingston, far from home. My fear of failure became the reason I failed. That and the 40+ degree weather during a heatwave on the range lolol.

Sierra, why move from BCCO to BCSS?
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Re: Ask A BC Sheriff

Postby Sierra1993 » Fri Jul 03, 2020 6:56 pm

noanykey wrote:
Fri Jul 03, 2020 2:16 pm
Hey folks,

Thank you for the response. Sierra, I'm really happy to hear that you went from BCCO to Sheriffs.
In CSC, that 3 strike rule really messed with me. Being in Kingston, far from home. My fear of failure became the reason I failed. That and the 40+ degree weather during a heatwave on the range lolol.

Sierra, why move from BCCO to BCSS?
I moved from BC Corrections because I got tired of walking in every day into a prison and being hounded by inmates at the unit desk for hours on end. I remember showing up for shift and walking into the secure area and just realizing that it wasn't where I wanted to be for the rest of my life - I saw the emotional toll and effect it would take on the officers there too longterm, even myself.

Sheriffs offers more; first and foremost, better training (like it is leagues above anything Corrections has) but also you get to interact with the public, you get to do actual LEO type work; and while Sheriffs is a bit underwhelming in that regard compared to police- at least that aspect of the job is there to begin with (warrant execution, serving documents, making arrests etc)

The only thing I miss about Corrections is the 4/4, outside of that (to me) Sheriffs is the better job. You just play a more visual role in the justice system in my opinion. It also comes with a lot more responsibility though (e.g carrying a firearm/taser) and you are really in the public eye a lot more. We also have way nicer vehicles, honestly some of the best looking law enforcement vehicles in my opinion :alright: just cant really use them for anything but transports and doc service - maybe the occasional immediate warrant for arrest you might get to do. That could change one day though.

I would always recommend Sheriffs over Corrections - but keep in mind, the hiring is a lot more limited, selection is tougher.

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Re: Ask A BC Sheriff

Postby Highland2012 » Wed Jul 15, 2020 2:50 pm

Sierra1993 wrote:
Fri Jul 03, 2020 6:56 pm
noanykey wrote:
Fri Jul 03, 2020 2:16 pm
Hey folks,

Thank you for the response. Sierra, I'm really happy to hear that you went from BCCO to Sheriffs.
In CSC, that 3 strike rule really messed with me. Being in Kingston, far from home. My fear of failure became the reason I failed. That and the 40+ degree weather during a heatwave on the range lolol.

Sierra, why move from BCCO to BCSS?
I moved from BC Corrections because I got tired of walking in every day into a prison and being hounded by inmates at the unit desk for hours on end. I remember showing up for shift and walking into the secure area and just realizing that it wasn't where I wanted to be for the rest of my life - I saw the emotional toll and effect it would take on the officers there too longterm, even myself.

Sheriffs offers more; first and foremost, better training (like it is leagues above anything Corrections has) but also you get to interact with the public, you get to do actual LEO type work; and while Sheriffs is a bit underwhelming in that regard compared to police- at least that aspect of the job is there to begin with (warrant execution, serving documents, making arrests etc)

The only thing I miss about Corrections is the 4/4, outside of that (to me) Sheriffs is the better job. You just play a more visual role in the justice system in my opinion. It also comes with a lot more responsibility though (e.g carrying a firearm/taser) and you are really in the public eye a lot more. We also have way nicer vehicles, honestly some of the best looking law enforcement vehicles in my opinion :alright: just cant really use them for anything but transports and doc service - maybe the occasional immediate warrant for arrest you might get to do. That could change one day though.

I would always recommend Sheriffs over Corrections - but keep in mind, the hiring is a lot more limited, selection is tougher.
I was in the exact same boat. I spent 2 years in corrections and then made the switch. I sort of did it on a whim, thinking no way I would get accepted but here I am. I am much more proud of the work I do as a sheriff, and I have a lot more pride in the organization. I feel waaaaay safer going to work in this environment and have the training, tools and experience necessary to deal with most problems. The management I would argue are also lot more supportive of their staff. When I worked in corrections I met the warden once during my graduation ceremony and that's it.. As a sheriff my inspector greets me every morning at briefing, has an open door policy, and actively gets to know every one of his deputies personally.

Deputy Sheriffs are indeed extremely well trained and the result of this makes me believe the role of a deputy sheriff is moving forward. Little by little the responsibilities of the B.C Sheriffs is increasing; with more responsibility comes more pay. I think in the next 5-10 years we will be looking at hitting the road and enforcing traffic (My personal opinion).

I loved corrections for the comradery, and the codes that got your blood pumping. It was an absolute gem for experience as well. At my centre I worked 4 on 5 off.. That's right, literally working less then half the month, making full time hours. It was amazing, and you could easily work another gig. Sheriffs are 5 and 2 so it was a complete turn around for me. For people with a family its the perfect schedule as you get all your holidays off, Christmas, Easter, long weekends, ect. But like you, Corrections was just a stepping stone in my career path as well. I didn't want to settle for that line of work either I like I saw a lot of other officers do.

I would absolutely recommend B.C Sheriffs as a career to anyone interested in law enforcement. Its good pay, good hours, and not usually very stressful.
RCMP
July19 Re-Inserted
July19 Psy- Done
Aug19 Med Exam- Pass
Oct19 Psy Int- Pass
Nov19 Med Clearance- pass
Nov19 SC submitted
Dec19 SP submitted
Feb20 Phone Int- pass
Feb20 Rit Int- pass
Mar 20 Poly- pass
May 20 BG- pass
SC in process
Troop:TBD


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