Martial arts

Health and fitness discussion. Discuss exercise routines, dieting plans, workout regimens, healthy living, etc.
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noanykey
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Re: Martial arts

Postby noanykey » Tue Apr 21, 2015 7:37 pm

Dave Brown wrote:
noanykey wrote:I train in BJJ,
Working as a bouncer and having to deal with things going south, BJJ was my go to art for safe, secure, and insanely cool looking take downs. Plus when police did come to make the arrest, it was quite easy for officers to put cuffs on without the suspect fighting back.

Yes, you are their hero.

Seriously though, do you EVER first read what you post before you hit submit?

That safe, secure and cool-looking takedown will last until your very first dogpile when someone who knows nothing about being politely "taken down" takes that shiny new badge and shoves it up your ass.

Sigh.

I guess that VERY strongly worded warning from Pete, one of the most experienced RCMP officers in Canada, didn't mean anything to you.


Ahh fair enough.. I'll just shut my mouth..

Apologies..
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Re: Martial arts

Postby drslimbizzle » Sun Aug 16, 2015 10:08 pm

I am a police officer and have boxed for approximately 7 years. Additionally, I have trained in mixed martial arts (lots of wrestling) for three years, and received my blue belt in BJJ.

Mixed martial arts has been amazing for staying fit, enjoying a healthy lifestyle, and providing confidence on the street. Boxing is great for cardio.

With that being said, I have employed wrestling techniques the most on the job and I have found my training in wrestling the most useful.

Just appropriate positioning is often all it takes to have the upper hand in a passively resistant, actively resistant or aggressive subject (no weapons).

I would seriously recommend wrestling and BJJ.
“As far as experience went, I was better off without chevrons and learned how to appreciate the trials of other men to an extent that I should never have been able to do had I been promoted.” - Sir Sam Steele

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Tango5
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Re: Martial arts

Postby Tango5 » Sun Aug 16, 2015 10:26 pm

drslimbizzle wrote:I am a police officer and have boxed for approximately 7 years. Additionally, I have trained in mixed martial arts (lots of wrestling) for three years, and received my blue belt in BJJ.

Mixed martial arts has been amazing for staying fit, enjoying a healthy lifestyle, and providing confidence on the street. Boxing is great for cardio.

With that being said, I have employed wrestling techniques the most on the job and I have found my training in wrestling the most useful.

Just appropriate positioning is often all it takes to have the upper hand in a passively resistant, actively resistant or aggressive subject (no weapons).

I would seriously recommend wrestling and BJJ.


Passively resisting subject needs a special (wrestling) position?
... For the Grammar Police, get off my back, I wasn't born here.

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drslimbizzle
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Re: Martial arts

Postby drslimbizzle » Mon Aug 17, 2015 1:14 am

Tango5 wrote:
drslimbizzle wrote:I am a police officer and have boxed for approximately 7 years. Additionally, I have trained in mixed martial arts (lots of wrestling) for three years, and received my blue belt in BJJ.

Mixed martial arts has been amazing for staying fit, enjoying a healthy lifestyle, and providing confidence on the street. Boxing is great for cardio.

With that being said, I have employed wrestling techniques the most on the job and I have found my training in wrestling the most useful.

Just appropriate positioning is often all it takes to have the upper hand in a passively resistant, actively resistant or aggressive subject (no weapons).

I would seriously recommend wrestling and BJJ.


Passively resisting subject needs a special (wrestling) position?


No a passively resistant subject does not need a special wrestling position... Nor does an actively resistant subject or an aggressive/assaultive subject.

But this topic is about the benefits of extra curricular martial arts training in law enforcement.

If someone was so inclined to believe that a subjects behaviour can change at any moment, thinking about your position may prove useful as a pro-active measure.
“As far as experience went, I was better off without chevrons and learned how to appreciate the trials of other men to an extent that I should never have been able to do had I been promoted.” - Sir Sam Steele

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Tango5
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Re: Martial arts

Postby Tango5 » Mon Aug 17, 2015 10:36 am

I was being little sarcastic. :D
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Shawshank
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Re: Martial arts

Postby Shawshank » Mon Aug 17, 2015 3:10 pm

Tango5 wrote:I was being little sarcastic. :D


It's hard to tell with some people on these forums.


That being said, I wrestled in highschool and grappled for a number of years. I found it really helped with body positioning and being able to stay upright. But I'm not on the job, so I can't say how it would apply to that.
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devilwoman
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Re: Martial arts

Postby devilwoman » Mon Aug 17, 2015 11:18 pm

I've taken up boxing and I love it. Beyond the workout it provides, it's helped with my positioning, muscle endurance (keep those hands up), hand-eye coordination, striking power, balance, you name it.

Eventually I'd like to get into muay tai or ju jitsu, to help work my lower body and close quarters fighting skills, but right now I enjoy just working the boxing. Besides, I have great knee strikes. Lol.
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Re: Martial arts

Postby Tango5 » Mon Aug 17, 2015 11:45 pm

Shawshank wrote:
Tango5 wrote:I was being little sarcastic. :D


It's hard to tell with some people on these forums.



Apologies.
I came back to include the /sarcasm... But it was too late :)
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Bitterman
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Re: Martial arts

Postby Bitterman » Wed Aug 19, 2015 10:55 pm

I'm an expert in the ancient martial art of "run away-fu".

The beauty of this fighting technique is that it requires very little actual fighting, and....
'The bigger and scarier your opponent, the better you are at it.

There are a few verbal tools as well.
My personal favorites are:

"You take the big one... I'll go get help"

And...

"Do what you want to the girl, but leave me alone!"
Admit nothing.
Deny everything.
Make counter accusations...

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bigbadjoe108
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Re: Martial arts

Postby bigbadjoe108 » Thu Aug 27, 2015 11:27 am

Bitterman wrote:I'm an expert in the ancient martial art of "run away-fu".

The beauty of this fighting technique is that it requires very little actual fighting, and....
'The bigger and scarier your opponent, the better you are at it.

There are a few verbal tools as well.
My personal favorites are:

"You take the big one... I'll go get help"

And...

"Do what you want to the girl, but leave me alone!"


Remember what the great Master Bret Maverick once said: "Run away today so you can live to run away another day!"
VVV

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noanykey
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Re: Martial arts

Postby noanykey » Tue Sep 22, 2015 3:10 pm

I've recently got into Police Judo. Training with a few LEO's as Instructors. Students range from municipal and RCMP, Sheriff's and CO's, and civilians looking to get into Law Enforcement as well. It's not like traditional Judo. They bring out cuffs and emphasize of scenario training, but you wear a gi and there's a belt system as well.

I was paying $150-60 per month for BJJ. I pay $200 for 3 months here.

Absolutely amazing program with outstanding instructors.
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Navrick
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Re: Martial arts

Postby Navrick » Thu Oct 08, 2015 9:59 pm

I train in Muay Thai and I find it stresses all fitness elements equally and on par with technique. Conditioning is a specifically notable component and when I walked out of my first session my shins, thighs and arms had goose-eggs on them! :wounded: !

About technique there aren't katas or forms per se, so practice is often done with a partner (or a heavy bag) through pad work or sparring.

I'm just an applicant, so I can't speak for the job, but in regards to the fitness tests required for police applications, there are specific martial arts that may benefit that field more effectively. Muay Thai is one of them.

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Re: Martial arts

Postby mck214 » Thu Dec 03, 2015 12:38 pm

I'm an amateur thai boxer currently 4-0 in competition. I spent time training on a camp in northern thailand a couple years ago and have fought all over north america. I have found while I was doing bar security that some of the throws and trips used from the clinch were perfect for taking guys to the ground.

I have trained with high level judo guys that are 20 pounds lighter and put me on my back in a millisecond. I have recently taken up BJJ and it could definitely save your life in a volatile situation as it is designed to take out a bigger opponent.

Someone also mentioned the conditioning it keeps you in as well as discipline, both very valid points as well. I would recommend submission grappling/BJJ/wrestling and judo specifically for law enforcement. Its the easiest way to de-escalate a physical confrontation in the safest way possible as an absolute last resort.

I wouldn't recommend boxing as it could come back on you with use of force issues, as well as someone maybe hitting there head the wrong way if you land clean and slipping into a coma or worse (lots of horror stories within the bar security world). I have also heard of hardened criminals and gang members that train very seriously and compete professionally. Staying sharp can save your life. I've met some of my best friends and a lot of amazing people through training.

If anyone is considering training specifically for on the job stuff remember to train SMART. I have picked up a lot of injuries from getting carried away with guys in sparring that, if I were a law enforcement officer at the time, would have looked poorly on me from my superiors. If there is a guy in the gym that is notorious for going hard during sparring, avoid him. Especially if he is a lot better than you ;) and if you have a few minor "owey's" let them heal up before getting back at it.
just some food for thought from my experiences.
Last edited by mck214 on Sun Dec 06, 2015 11:30 am, edited 3 times in total.

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Re: Martial arts

Postby mck214 » Thu Dec 03, 2015 2:00 pm

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