This is why most MD's shouldn't give out advice on lifting

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48highlander
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This is why most MD's shouldn't give out advice on lifting

Postby 48highlander » Sat Jan 11, 2014 12:32 am

http://www.latimes.com/health/la-he-do- ... z2q3y3NxyN

Bench presses

Melamed says people tend to arch their back on weight benches, more so as they tire or as they increase the weight. That can lead to a torn annulus, the tissue that protects the disks in the spine. Most of the time those tears can heal themselves, but it can take a year, he says. "How do I know? Because I did it too."

One way to prevent that is to raise the legs into tabletop position, keeping your back flat on the bench.


Another bad move is bouncing the barbell off the chest, which also occurs more as people tire. If you can't move smoothly and can't complete at least 15 repetitions, you might be trying to lift too much weight, Melamed says.

Improper weightlifting can cause sciatic pain, bulging disks and ligament sprains, he says.

Melamed recommends doing weight work at the end of a workout, when you are already somewhat tired and likely to use lighter weights. "It's about having good form, and also you are warmed up so you're less likely to get hurt."



For a doc this guy is retarded....so much bad advice.
1) A lumbar arch is natural.....it's how your f'ing back is made. An EXCESSIVE arch can be bad IF your are inexperienced and/or not using a bench shirt/belt. Don't want to blow your back out on a bench, employ the Valsalva technique, engage your "core", and keep your feet flat footed on the ground ACTIVELY drive your feet into the floor as you press.
Which brings me to...
2) NEVER bench with your feet in the air or on the bench. People erroneusly believe this is somehow 'safer' for your back. Lying on a narrow bench while pressing a heavy bar over your chest/throat/face is risky enough. Removing your feet and therefore your stability just increases that risk needlessly. If this was in any way safe, or effective for strength, powerlifters would do this routinely. Want to keep your low back safe, follow point one.
3)I guess powerlifting and lifting in the 3-5 rep range is dangerous...guess he is afraid of being strong.
4)Last lifting in a fatigued state.....lemme get this straight......This guy advice to PREVENT injury is to lift a heavy object over your throat and face, while tired, and with no means to keep yourself balanced and supported......yeah....no.



On Second thought, I will be in LA in Feb, maybe I can schedule a consult, use his advice for my bench, and then when I hurt myself, sue for negligence and malpractice.....he is a MD after all... :twisted:

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Re: This is why most MD's shouldn't give out advice on lifti

Postby Gardenfit » Sat Jan 11, 2014 1:53 am

Maybe you could put these tips in a health & fitness section on your blog.

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48highlander
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Re: This is why most MD's shouldn't give out advice on lifti

Postby 48highlander » Sat Jan 11, 2014 1:57 am

Gardenfit wrote:Maybe you could put these tips in a health & fitness section on your blog.



Thought about it, once I get my laptop working right again. I can't access my blog from work.

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Re: This is why most MD's shouldn't give out advice on lifti

Postby Cake » Sat Jan 11, 2014 3:45 am

He is not 100% wrong.

He is just trying to spread awarness about long term effects. He is targeting the population that only trains 1-2 times a week.

If you train 4-6 times a week, you know you can call BS on his claims. How do you think Arnold became Arnold? From putting his feet on the bench? lol :lol:
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Re: This is why most MD's shouldn't give out advice on lifti

Postby 48highlander » Sat Jan 11, 2014 6:14 am

Cake wrote:He is not 100% wrong.

He is just trying to spread awarness about long term effects. He is targeting the population that only trains 1-2 times a week.

If you train 4-6 times a week, you know you can call BS on his claims. How do you think Arnold became Arnold? From putting his feet on the bench? lol :lol:


Espousing rotten advise is still rotten advice, regardless if the target audience are novices or not. ESPECIALLY because the novice won't know this is really really bad advice.

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Re: This is why most MD's shouldn't give out advice on lifti

Postby Cake » Sat Jan 11, 2014 6:46 am

The MD seems like a big fan of High rep style lifting, less weight more reps. The kind of work out to keep yourself cut.

Try a real mans workout where you 3-5 rep 250+lbs Bench!
Do or do not, there is no try - Yoda

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Re: This is why most MD's shouldn't give out advice on lifti

Postby devilwoman » Sat Jan 11, 2014 6:57 am

The doctor should explain that his advice is for novices/beginners and that they are tips to avoid injuries. I understand the caution about arching the back on presses, as I have seen people who are new trying to push too hard too fast and lifting more than they should....all for beach muscles.

I also think that he needs to offer more explanation on amount of reps per set. Randomly saying that you need to complete 15 reps is piss poor advice, IMHO.....you're going to get some New Years gym rat reading that and think they should be able to push heavy weight for high reps. He truly needs to expand on reps per set and specifics as to what the benefits of high rep/low weight vs low rep/heavy weight and vice versa can offer the exerciser.

Very poorly written and not overly detailed....which is a terrible combination when it comes to exercise articles.
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Re: This is why most MD's shouldn't give out advice on lifti

Postby 48highlander » Sat Jan 11, 2014 7:04 am

I have always wondered how these journalists decide who to feature for these kind of fluff articles.

The other thing I noticed on re-reading (since I was only curious about what mr MD's advice on the bench press would be)....you shouldn't do jumping excercises with kettlebells........Who the hell does that?? Where is such nonsense talking place?

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Re: This is why most MD's shouldn't give out advice on lifti

Postby Cake » Sat Jan 11, 2014 8:14 am

What!? I think i missed the part with the jumping Kettle Bells.

Are jumping jax with Kettle Bells the new thing?
Do or do not, there is no try - Yoda

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Re: This is why most MD's shouldn't give out advice on lifti

Postby 48highlander » Sat Jan 11, 2014 8:21 am

Cake wrote:What!? I think i missed the part with the jumping Kettle Bells.

Are jumping jax with Kettle Bells the new thing?


I didn't quote it, the link is a much longer article. Maybe in LA it's a thing.

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Re: This is why most MD's shouldn't give out advice on lifti

Postby devilwoman » Sat Jan 11, 2014 9:59 am

Some common exercises require jumping with the kettle bell. It's important to land on the balls of the feet — "like a cat" — and with the knees behind the toes to avoid knee injuries such as tearing the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), he says.

http://www.latimes.com/health/la-he-do- ... z2q6NhONY5


Okay, I'm HUGE into kettlebell work and am always in search of new techniques/exercises and I have NEVER seen or done jumping exercises with them. The only "jumping" aspect of it I could see would be where you are doing the thrusters or cleans and presses/jerks where you are thrusting the weight upwards....how that can be confused with jumping, I don't know.
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Re: This is why most MD's shouldn't give out advice on lifti

Postby Cake » Sat Jan 11, 2014 9:56 pm

devilwoman wrote:
Some common exercises require jumping with the kettle bell. It's important to land on the balls of the feet — "like a cat" — and with the knees behind the toes to avoid knee injuries such as tearing the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), he says.

http://www.latimes.com/health/la-he-do- ... z2q6NhONY5


Okay, I'm HUGE into kettlebell work and am always in search of new techniques/exercises and I have NEVER seen or done jumping exercises with them. The only "jumping" aspect of it I could see would be where you are doing the thrusters or cleans and presses/jerks where you are thrusting the weight upwards....how that can be confused with jumping, I don't know.


That's what I was thinking.

Always fun to see what american MDs come up with to scare people. Suck it up princess or go back to your zumba class
Do or do not, there is no try - Yoda

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Re: This is why most MD's shouldn't give out advice on lifti

Postby 48highlander » Sun Jan 12, 2014 1:08 am

Cake wrote:
devilwoman wrote:
Some common exercises require jumping with the kettle bell. It's important to land on the balls of the feet — "like a cat" — and with the knees behind the toes to avoid knee injuries such as tearing the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), he says.

http://www.latimes.com/health/la-he-do- ... z2q6NhONY5


Okay, I'm HUGE into kettlebell work and am always in search of new techniques/exercises and I have NEVER seen or done jumping exercises with them. The only "jumping" aspect of it I could see would be where you are doing the thrusters or cleans and presses/jerks where you are thrusting the weight upwards....how that can be confused with jumping, I don't know.


That's what I was thinking.

Always fun to see what american MDs come up with to scare people. Suck it up princess or go back to your zumba class


I have seen silly crap like this from Canadians, this only got my attention cause it was in Stars and Stripes, which they give away for free here in the dining halls.

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Re: This is why most MD's shouldn't give out advice on lifti

Postby Shawshank » Sun Jan 12, 2014 10:18 am

Cake wrote:The MD seems like a big fan of High rep style lifting, less weight more reps. The kind of work out to keep yourself cut.

Try a real mans workout where you 3-5 rep 250+lbs Bench!



Where I come from, we call that a warm up. LOL

But seriously, I don't want to read his article for fear I will just raise my blood pressure, but what are his qualifications. You said he was an MD, but I wouldn't expect my family doctor to perform heart surgery on me as that isn't his area. So what makes this guy an authority to talk about this?

On a side note, I went to a GP md a few years ago with a lower back problem. Her response was to stop lifting weights and take up running.
K division.

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Re: This is why most MD's shouldn't give out advice on lifti

Postby 48highlander » Sun Jan 12, 2014 10:48 am

Shawshank wrote:
Cake wrote:The MD seems like a big fan of High rep style lifting, less weight more reps. The kind of work out to keep yourself cut.

Try a real mans workout where you 3-5 rep 250+lbs Bench!



Where I come from, we call that a warm up. LOL

But seriously, I don't want to read his article for fear I will just raise my blood pressure, but what are his qualifications. You said he was an MD, but I wouldn't expect my family doctor to perform heart surgery on me as that isn't his area. So what makes this guy an authority to talk about this?

On a side note, I went to a GP md a few years ago with a lower back problem. Her response was to stop lifting weights and take up running.


Orthapedic Surgeon specializing in Scoliosis patients....and he hurt his back once, benching.., and I quoted the only interesting part (apart from the weird quip about jumping with kettlebells). The other things mentioned were using an elipitical and bicep curls.....


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