RCMP auxiliary PC ?

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dusty
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Re: RCMP auxiliary PC ?

Postby dusty » Tue Mar 18, 2008 6:02 am

I'd be interested to know the details and parameters around this detail in Burnaby as it does not appear to be common place...perhaps a pilot?


Hopefully it's not becoming common place, or it'll be a matter of time before one of them gets hurt. How many times does it have to be stated that they are volunteers, not trained police officers. They serve many valuable functions, however, going to radio calls and being used as supplementary police to patrol their area is not one of them. I have no problems taking ridealongs with me who are interested in learning, however, I think having an aux work solo in a car is a major safety issue.
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Re: RCMP auxiliary PC ?

Postby NSAUX » Tue Mar 18, 2008 7:50 am

dusty wrote:
I'd be interested to know the details and parameters around this detail in Burnaby as it does not appear to be common place...perhaps a pilot?


Hopefully it's not becoming common place, or it'll be a matter of time before one of them gets hurt. How many times does it have to be stated that they are volunteers, not trained police officers. They serve many valuable functions, however, going to radio calls and being used as supplementary police to patrol their area is not one of them. I have no problems taking ridealongs with me who are interested in learning, however, I think having an aux work solo in a car is a major safety issue.


I have agree, as an Auxiliary I would not be interested in working solo un-armed. With another member is one thing, but operating a marked unit is just asking for an accident to happen.

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Re: RCMP auxiliary PC ?

Postby Bald Man » Tue Mar 18, 2008 9:26 am

NSAUX wrote:
dusty wrote:
I'd be interested to know the details and parameters around this detail in Burnaby as it does not appear to be common place...perhaps a pilot?


Hopefully it's not becoming common place, or it'll be a matter of time before one of them gets hurt. How many times does it have to be stated that they are volunteers, not trained police officers. They serve many valuable functions, however, going to radio calls and being used as supplementary police to patrol their area is not one of them. I have no problems taking ridealongs with me who are interested in learning, however, I think having an aux work solo in a car is a major safety issue.


I have agree, as an Auxiliary I would not be interested in working solo un-armed. With another member is one thing, but operating a marked unit is just asking for an accident to happen.


Special Cst's in Ontario work alone and unarmed as part of their duties.

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Re: RCMP auxiliary PC ?

Postby dusty » Tue Mar 18, 2008 7:13 pm

Most LE work unarmed, but they aren't attending 911 calls or in a uniform that would identify them as police. (and yes I'm aware of exceptions). It is a bad incident waiting to happen to have unarmed aux's patrolling solo in marked cars.
I personally did it for the money and the glory... my disappointment was tempered by the fact that I got a gun and a fast car-VanB

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Re: RCMP auxiliary PC ?

Postby Cop23 » Tue Mar 18, 2008 11:53 pm

I do not agree that Aux. or any other persons can drive a marked police vehicle. As police officers, most if not all departments have a strict policy ordering us to carry on our vest and gun in the trunk, if driving a marked car without uniform on.

Why the hell an Aux or other human being would drive by with a police car in public, not being armed.

The fact that AUXILIARY is written on the car doesn't make it up for it. You have to look for it, lot of people would not even see it. The markings are the same, uniform alike, and lightbars are on the roof.

This is not against AUX members, this pisses me off for security purposes.
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Re: RCMP auxiliary PC ?

Postby Boxer Dogs » Thu Mar 20, 2008 3:06 am

The Auxiliary arrived at virtually the same time as the Regular Member. The only reason I really gave the car a second look is because we're getting some Dodge Chargers into our fleet soon. The Auxiliary car looked like a regular police car, just without the word "Police" anywhere on it. The lights were red/blue, which is strange, because as I understand, the BC MVA only allows Police to utilize red/blue. The VPD's Traffic Authority Unit (Special Constables) use red/clear, and the block the street with their cars no problem.
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Re: RCMP auxiliary PC ?

Postby Apollo » Thu Mar 20, 2008 12:31 pm

In Toronto Auxiliary Constables take the cars out all the time to community events or parades. I don't see a problem with that. The car is for the kids. Although, sometimes auxiliary members are authorized to drive around running plates or to other details. Each division has different rules regarding auxiliaries driving the cars.

The above it debatable.

However, I do not agree with auxiliaries responding to 911 calls. This is absolutely ridicules.

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Re: RCMP auxiliary PC ?

Postby th » Thu Mar 20, 2008 12:41 pm

nkellof wrote:The Auxiliary arrived at virtually the same time as the Regular Member. The only reason I really gave the car a second look is because we're getting some Dodge Chargers into our fleet soon. The Auxiliary car looked like a regular police car, just without the word "Police" anywhere on it. The lights were red/blue, which is strange, because as I understand, the BC MVA only allows Police to utilize red/blue. The VPD's Traffic Authority Unit (Special Constables) use red/clear, and the block the street with their cars no problem.
RCMP A/Csts aren't Special Constables under the BC Police Act. Also, VPD made the decision to take the blue lights out of the VTA cars to make them more distinct from actual police cars without any statutory requirement to do so. Delta, Victoria, and Saanich Specials all are able to use Red/Blue in their respective departments.
:wave:

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Re: RCMP auxiliary PC ?

Postby Boxer Dogs » Thu Mar 20, 2008 1:30 pm

th wrote:
nkellof wrote:The Auxiliary arrived at virtually the same time as the Regular Member. The only reason I really gave the car a second look is because we're getting some Dodge Chargers into our fleet soon. The Auxiliary car looked like a regular police car, just without the word "Police" anywhere on it. The lights were red/blue, which is strange, because as I understand, the BC MVA only allows Police to utilize red/blue. The VPD's Traffic Authority Unit (Special Constables) use red/clear, and the block the street with their cars no problem.
RCMP A/Csts aren't Special Constables under the BC Police Act. Also, VPD made the decision to take the blue lights out of the VTA cars to make them more distinct from actual police cars without any statutory requirement to do so. Delta, Victoria, and Saanich Specials all are able to use Red/Blue in their respective departments.


Cool. I didn't know that.
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Re: RCMP auxiliary PC ?

Postby FordAve » Thu Mar 20, 2008 8:23 pm

NSAUX wrote:
dusty wrote:
I'd be interested to know the details and parameters around this detail in Burnaby as it does not appear to be common place...perhaps a pilot?


Hopefully it's not becoming common place, or it'll be a matter of time before one of them gets hurt. How many times does it have to be stated that they are volunteers, not trained police officers. They serve many valuable functions, however, going to radio calls and being used as supplementary police to patrol their area is not one of them. I have no problems taking ridealongs with me who are interested in learning, however, I think having an aux work solo in a car is a major safety issue.


I have agree, as an Auxiliary I would not be interested in working solo un-armed. With another member is one thing, but operating a marked unit is just asking for an accident to happen.


Auxiliaries generally don't work solo, except for rare circumstances. they are usually paired up with another auxiliary.

In some detachments, the auxiliaries have been around a lot longer, then the regular officers. I've seen regulars working on their own, with less then a month of field training. Hardly what I would call a lot of experience. Perhaps more of a safety issue, then two experienced auxiliaries working together.

Auxiliaries are required to go through training and must recertify on Use of Force every two years. They aren't just handed a uniform and sent out on the street.
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Re: RCMP auxiliary PC ?

Postby Cop23 » Fri Mar 21, 2008 2:02 am


Auxiliaries generally don't work solo, except for rare circumstances. they are usually paired up with another auxiliary.

In some detachments, the auxiliaries have been around a lot longer, then the regular officers. I've seen regulars working on their own, with less then a month of field training. Hardly what I would call a lot of experience. Perhaps more of a safety issue, then two experienced auxiliaries working together.

Auxiliaries are required to go through training and must recertify on Use of Force every two years. They aren't just handed a uniform and sent out on the street.


You will not sell it to me. Put 4 aux in a squad car and I will still argue to it. Not armed, not trained as a PO, you shouldn't drive a squad car, and you should not be solo or paired up.

Aux. members should be paired up with a PO, if not, stay in the office.

Safety reasons and it makes sens.


In some detachments, the auxiliaries have been around a lot longer, then the regular officers. I've seen regulars working on their own, with less then a month of field training. Hardly what I would call a lot of experience. Perhaps more of a safety issue, then two experienced auxiliaries working together.


Still 6 months of intense training followed of 1 month on the road. I agree, not a lot of experience, but still more than Aux. He has a gun and knows how and when to use it.
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Re: RCMP auxiliary PC ?

Postby Orange » Fri Mar 21, 2008 5:40 am

Here we go again.

*gets the popcorn*

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Re: RCMP auxiliary PC ?

Postby NSAUX » Fri Mar 21, 2008 10:25 am

Cop23 wrote:

Auxiliaries generally don't work solo, except for rare circumstances. they are usually paired up with another auxiliary.

In some detachments, the auxiliaries have been around a lot longer, then the regular officers. I've seen regulars working on their own, with less then a month of field training. Hardly what I would call a lot of experience. Perhaps more of a safety issue, then two experienced auxiliaries working together.

Auxiliaries are required to go through training and must recertify on Use of Force every two years. They aren't just handed a uniform and sent out on the street.



You will not sell it to me. Put 4 aux in a squad car and I will still argue to it. Not armed, not trained as a PO, you shouldn't drive a squad car, and you should not be solo or paired up.

Aux. members should be paired up with a PO, if not, stay in the office.

Safety reasons and it makes sens.


In some detachments, the auxiliaries have been around a lot longer, then the regular officers. I've seen regulars working on their own, with less then a month of field training. Hardly what I would call a lot of experience. Perhaps more of a safety issue, then two experienced auxiliaries working together.


Still 6 months of intense training followed of 1 month on the road. I agree, not a lot of experience, but still more than Aux. He has a gun and knows how and when to use it.


As an Aux. for 8 years and a strong supporter of the program..... I agree, we should only work with a RM, I have worked with lots of recruits and yes they will even ask us lots of questions, but they have way more training than I have, even though they might only have a few months service. It is funny when the client thinks I'm the supervisor because of the different uniform, ( can't be the grey hair! :roll: )

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Re: RCMP auxiliary PC ?

Postby NorthernProtector » Fri Mar 21, 2008 10:49 am

th wrote:RCMP A/Csts aren't Special Constables under the BC Police Act. Also, VPD made the decision to take the blue lights out of the VTA cars to make them more distinct from actual police cars without any statutory requirement to do so. Delta, Victoria, and Saanich Specials all are able to use Red/Blue in their respective departments.


No they are not S/Cst's however the authorities are simlar, in fact, an Auxiliary Constable does not have any term or restiction of duties that are imposed on S/Cst's. They may have MORE authority than a S/Cst. in some cases.

"officer", except in section 47 (2), means a person appointed under this Act as a provincial constable, special provincial constable, designated constable, municipal constable, special municipal constable, auxiliary constable or enforcement officer, but does not include a person who is a member of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police

Auxiliary constables

8 (1) On the recommendation of the commissioner, the minister may appoint persons the minister considers suitable as auxiliary constables.

(2) An auxiliary constable must assist the provincial police force in the performance of its duties.

(3) Subject to the regulations, an auxiliary constable has the powers, duties and immunities of a provincial constable.

Special provincial constables

9 (1) The minister may appoint persons the minister considers suitable as special provincial constables.

(2) A special provincial constable appointed under subsection (1) is appointed for the term the minister specifies in the appointment.

(3) Subject to the restrictions specified in the appointment and the regulations, a special provincial constable has the powers, duties and immunities of a provincial constable.
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Re: RCMP auxiliary PC ?

Postby FordAve » Fri Mar 21, 2008 12:05 pm

One of the problems with the RCMP auxiliary program is that each division gives their auxiliaries different training. Also policy in each division is different. Auxiliaries that have tried to transfer from one division to another often have difficulty because of the different training they have received.

An auxiliary can just as easily be hurt or killed riding with a regular member. All of the RCMP auxiliaries that have been in killed in the line of duty, were killed in MVA's while riding with a regular member. Auxiliaries sign up knowing very well that they are going to face risks.
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